Thu
Jul 20 2006
04:00 pm
By: Paul Witt

From here via Facing South: 

We should never forget the 33 members of the Hall of Shame: Jo Bonner and Terry Everett of Alabama; Trent Franks and John B. Shadegg of Arizona; Wally Herger, John T. Doolittle, Edward R. Royce, Gary G. Miller, Dana Rohrabacher, John Campbell, all of California; Joel Hefly and Thomas G. Tancredo of Colorado; Tom Price, John Linder, Lynn A. Westmoreland, Charlie Norwood, Nathan Deal and Phil Gingrey, all of Georgia; Dan Burton of Indiana, Iowa’s Steve King, Richard H. Baker of Louisiana, Roscoe G. Barlett of Maryland, New Jersey’s Scott Garrett; Virginia Foxx and Patrick T. McHenry of North Carolina; South Carolina’s J. Gresham Barrett, John J. Duncan Jr. from Tennessee and six from Texas: Sam Johnson, Jeb Hensarling, Joe Barton, K. Michael Conaway, Mac Thornberry and Ron Paul.

No Democrats voted against it but 33 Republicans did.

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R. Neal's picture

Yeah, I was a little

Yeah, I was a little surprised and disappointed by that.

Anonymous's picture

Let's be fair boys. Here

Let's be fair boys. Here are Duncan's comments from the KNS about why he voted "no". It's not like he's trying to keep AA's from voting...there are other issues within the same bill.

Knoxville Rep. John J. Duncan Jr., a Republican, was the only Tennessean to vote against the bill.

He said that the country has made great strides in the past 50 years so the voting rights requirements in targeted states are no longer needed. He also opposed the bill's requirement to print ballots in multiple languages, saying English should be the country's language.

"It's a totally unnecessary bill," Duncan said. "There's nobody in any of these (monitored) states now that is trying to stop anybody from voting."

Factchecker's picture

He said that the country has

He said that the country has made great strides in the past 50 years so the voting rights requirements in targeted states are no longer needed.

No damn thanks to his party.  Many, mostly on the far right, say the same about Affirmative Action.  But the statistics show that the underprivileged and discriminated groups, which are steadily improving because of AA, are still lagging the more affluent, who can take opportunity for granted.  Same applies to voting access.

"It's a totally unnecessary bill," Duncan said. "There's nobody in any of these (monitored) states now that is trying to stop anybody from voting." 

Ignoring things like racially-profiled voter registration purges, which occurred in Florida in 2000, and the lack of voting access in heavily minority-populated precincts that in 2004 caused waiting lines of many hours in some areas, vs. a few minutes in affluent white precincts.  There are too many other instances to lend any more attention to the mockery in Duncan's words.

_________________________________

Never has the left been so right.

Rachel's picture

"It's a totally unnecessary

"It's a totally unnecessary bill," Duncan said. "There's nobody in any of these (monitored) states now that is trying to stop anybody from voting."

Nah.  Nothing like that going on anymore.

http://stevegilliard.blogspot.com/2006/07/georgia-poll-tax-law-struck-down-again.html

 

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