Sun
Apr 19 2020
06:25 am
By: R. Neal
Topics:
jbr's picture

Patients compensate for the

Patients compensate for the low oxygen in their blood by breathing faster and deeper — and this happens without their realizing it. This silent hypoxia, and the patient’s physiological response to it, causes even more inflammation and more air sacs to collapse, and the pneumonia worsens until oxygen levels plummet. In effect, patients are injuring their own lungs by breathing harder and harder. Twenty percent of Covid pneumonia patients then go on to a second and deadlier phase of lung injury. Fluid builds up and the lungs become stiff, carbon dioxide rises, and patients develop acute respiratory failure.

The Infection That’s Silently Killing Coronavirus Patients

jbr's picture

Amazon using thermal cameras for coronavirus temperature check

Amazon has started using thermal cameras at its operations facilities to screen workers for fevers, a common symptom of the novel coronavirus.

Amazon is using thermal cameras for coronavirus temperature checks

fischbobber's picture

Blood oxygen tests

If I remember correctly, blood oxygen testers are cheap and easy to use. They are also a much better indicator of covid-19. It seems to more of a blood disease than a lung disease, messing up the transfer of oxygen to the blood cells. Am I missing something?

jbr's picture

I may be wrong, but my

I may be wrong, but my understanding is most if not all people with covid have a fever. It is a common symptom that shows up early. Sometimes covid pneumonia develops and then oxygen deprivation comes into play as a characteristic.

From the article reference above ...

Normal oxygen saturation for most persons at sea level is 94 percent to 100 percent; Covid pneumonia patients I saw had oxygen saturations as low as 50 percent.

My understanding is oxygen saturation below 90 percent needs to be addressed.

fischbobber's picture

Exactly.

It ends in the blood, not the lungs. From what I understand.

jbr's picture

Covid-19 causes sudden strokes in young adults, doctors say

The new coronavirus appears to be causing sudden strokes in adults in their 30s and 40s who are not otherwise terribly ill, doctors reported Wednesday.

Covid-19 causes sudden strokes in young adults, doctors say

jbr's picture

Seniors with Covid-19 show unusual symptoms, doctors say

Covid-19 is typically signaled by three symptoms: a fever, an insistent cough and shortness of breath. But older adults — the age group most at risk of severe complications or death from this condition ― may have none of these characteristics.

Seniors with Covid-19 show unusual symptoms, doctors say

jbr's picture

See how far spit droplets travel through air when we talk

The CDC recommends that all Americans wear face coverings in public.

See how far spit droplets travel through air when we talk

bizgrrl's picture

Antilockdown protester in

Antilockdown protester in Tennessee carries poster that says,

"Sacrifice the Weak, Re-Open TN"

We're so proud. /snark

jbr's picture

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan plans to crack down on grocery stores

I don't know about local grocery testing, but the last time I was in Publix next to campus it looked like every employee had on a mask. I don't think that is the case at Kroger and others.

He said that by Monday, May 11, every grocery store in the city should be able to demonstrate that every single employee has a recent negative COVID-19 test.

Duggan said that if grocery store employees do not get tested, the city will take appropriate legal action.

City of Detroit planning to crack down on COVID-19 testing for grocery store employees

bizgrrl's picture

At the Food City I shopped at

At the Food City I shopped at recently only one employee out of about ten had a mask.

Mike Knapp's picture

Target was 50/50 of employees masked

~25% of customers but they were also rocking the clean carts like they have been at Krogers

jbr's picture

60 Minutes - computer algorithm among the first to detect virus

On New Year's Eve, a small company in Canada was among the first to raise the alarm about an infectious disease outbreak. Its computer algorithm calculated where the virus might spread next. The technology could change the way we fight another contagion.

The computer algorithm that was among the first to detect the coronavirus outbreak

jbr's picture

Non-covid19 deaths spike in March and April

Deaths across America spiked as Covid-19 began its spread, and many were never attributed to the new coronavirus, researchers reported Monday.

Patients already weakened by pre-existing conditions such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease may have had a death listed as being due to one of those causes, rather than coronavirus.

Deaths spiked as Covid-19 spread in March and April, new analysis finds

jbr's picture

Companies look at legal liability for coronavirus infections

As companies start planning their reopenings, business groups are pushing Congress to limit liability from potential lawsuits filed by workers and customers infected by the coronavirus.

Companies look to limit legal liability for coronavirus infections

jbr's picture

Costco to require face coverings for shoppers

jbr's picture

Texas Zoo is opening back up with a drive-thru experience

The San Antonio Zoo announced it is giving families the opportunity pack up their cars and drive-thru the park for a limited amount of time.

A Texas Zoo is opening back up to the public with a drive-thru experience

jbr's picture

Deaths soar in country that didn't lock down

Unlike its European neighbors, Swedish officials did not institute lock down measures to combat the Covid-19 epidemic.

Deaths soar in country that didn't lock down. Officials identify big reason why.

fischbobber's picture

Martin and Glenn

The Swedish Protocol is essentially what was instituted in Knox County after a propaganda campaign, full of lies and damn lies by Martin Daniel over The weekend. We got a little less disciplined version though. Stay tuned. We have every reason to believe death will follow.

Daniels cut me off from his facebook account when I noted that causing the willful death of another human was murder and pointing out the his legislative immunity from prosecution would be over after he fails to run for re-election. I'm not sure about the nuts and bolts of his, or Jacobs immunity from prosecution (I presume it would be something along a massive drunk driving killing spree) , buy I'm pretty sure that was the area of comment that lead to my exit.

fischbobber's picture

Death rates

Sweden's death rate is 12% and appears to be growing. So much for Daniels statistical insignificance.

fischbobber's picture

Sweden's death rate

Sweden's death rate has been slowly, steadily rising over the course of the last few days. It is now at 12.34%.

jbr's picture

Rangers advise caution amid reopenings

In mid-March, many of America’s national parks shut down to help slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. Wildlife quickly moved into the spaces now lacking the traffic jams and noisy hikers that have become a staple of parks across the country. Bears are grazing in meadows near California’s Yosemite Valley Visitor Center, and elk were undisturbed at the beginning of the spring calving season in Yellowstone National Park. After 327 million visitors to national parks in 2019, the shutdowns have given the park ecologies a moment to breathe.

National park closings gave wildlife room to roam. Rangers advise caution amid reopenings.

jbr's picture

Siberian zoo sees animal baby boom during lockdown

A Siberian zoo that closed its doors to visitors for over two months due to the coronavirus says the lockdown has encouraged a baby boom among its animals.

Among the zoo's new arrivals are rare Egyptian goslings, reindeer calves, llama crias and a baby brown weeper capuchin monkey.

Siberian zoo sees animal baby boom during lockdown

jbr's picture

Most dangerous place in the grocery store

Eric Feigl-Ding, an epidemiologist and health economist at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health, said cashiers "need N95 masks as much as health care workers." He believes that all stores also need to give their cashiers face shields because many coronavirus carriers are asymptomatic. In China, stores are sanitizing cash, and the United States "should as well at some point."

This is the most dangerous place in the grocery store

jbr's picture

Wearing masks, South Korean students to go back to school

Widespread testing, intensive contact tracing and tracking apps have enabled South Korea to limit the spread of the virus without the extensive lockdowns seen in other countries.

After suffering the first major coronavirus outbreak outside China, South Korea has succeeded in lowering the daily rate of infections to around 10 or less, mostly imported.

Wearing masks, South Korean students to go back to school

bizgrrl's picture

What's wrong with these

What's wrong with these people? Oh, wait, they're just using the president's guidance.

You missed the one where some guy in Texas pushed a Texas park ranger into a body of water. The guy was caught and arrested.

jbr's picture

The psychology behind why some people won't wear masks

Aronoff compared the mask guidance to the ban on smoking cigarettes in restaurants or schools.

"There are rules about not smoking in enclosed restaurants and bars because that smoke can be deleterious to someone else's health," he said. "Now we're in a situation where, if I'm infected with the Covid-19 virus, my breath can be lethal to someone else."

The psychology behind why some people won't wear masks

jbr's picture

Mask incident in Alabama

jbr's picture

Man refusing to wear mask breaks arm of Target employee

Two men were arrested for felony battery after starting a fight with employees at a Los Angeles Target store over wearing masks inside the store.

Man refusing to wear mask breaks arm of Target employee

jbr's picture

Video shows Costco worker calmly handle customer berating him

"Sir, have a great day. You are no longer welcome here in our warehouse," the worker responds. "You need to leave. Thank you very much."

Video shows Costco worker calmly handle customer berating him over mask policy

jbr's picture

Masks seem to be working to fight the virus

Americans are at odds over whether it's necessary to keep taking coronavirus protective measures, but a leading researcher says the data is clear: The path ahead in the Covid-19 pandemic is being shaped by masks.

"We now have really clear evidence that wearing masks works -- it's probably a 50% protection against transmission," Dr. Chris Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, or IHME, at the University of Washington, told CNN late Tuesday.

Masks seem to be working to fight the virus, even as some refuse them and US deaths near 100,000

Moon's picture

IHME

It would seem to me that it is not unwise to question IHME's credibility in these matters. And given the group's previous data tomfoolery, one wonders how they were ever again accepted as experts at anything.

fischbobber's picture

Or

You could look at the results being achieved in countries mandating masks, Austria, Japan, etc.

Moon's picture

"...look at results being achieved..." elsewhere

You could look at the results being achieved in countries mandating masks, Austria, Japan, etc.

I agree. Thus far, the "look around and see what is actually happening" method of modeling/forecasting seems much more useful than anything that has come out of academia.

fischbobber's picture

In fairness to academia....

They are being asked to give us years worth of answers in days. The questions government should be asking are "What non-specific techniques could be used to slow and control the spread of this?"

Instead, our leaders are trying to get through this by election day, which, ironically, is the best way to extend the virus' run.

We don't even know what all this disease does yet. And the more we find out the worse/more bizarre it gets.

AC's picture

Please. "Academia" does not

Please. "Academia" does not speak with a single voice - it is comprised of people and methodologies, some better than others. Academic methods and scientific methods involve continual debate and revisions and modifications as new information and data becomes available. It's a bit ironic that you would cite a scientific (and academic) publication such as the Lancet to support your case and then take a swipe at "academia." This comment comes across as another example of the Beavis and Butthead tribalism that damages thoughtful discourse. What's even sadder is when showing concern and respect for others - in this case, being willing to take precautions to protect the health of others - is regarded as a threat to one's manhood and sense of independence. That's weak.

Moon's picture

You're correct, Ashley

You are right, Ashley. I will be more specific.

There are (at least) two groups whose C-19 models, forecasts and predictions have been so horribly wrong that their good reputations do not deserve unquestioned restoration:

1. The University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, and
2. The Coronavirus-19 Outbreak Response Experts (CORE-19) group at UT's Baker Center.

While it is unfair to paint "academia" with the same dirty monolithic brush, there is a macro flaw in the way we are using academic research as it related to C-19. As pointed out by a fishbobber, academicians are not typically asked to immediately produce models that will be immediately used for massive public policy decisions within hours of the completion of their work. Academic research typically has the luxury of publication and years of peer challenges and attempts at replication - all of which typically occurs outside of general public view.

This is a rare instance of certain academicians' work being immediately used on an unprecedented scale. And quite tragically, the vast majority of public decision-makers chose the wrong academic models on which to base their decisions.

Mike Knapp's picture

IHME's work as an ostensible policy basis was a massive failure

And quite tragically, the vast majority of public decision-makers chose the wrong academic models on which to base their decisions.

There's the model array and there's the selection of which ones. That the key decision makers in question chose a particular model which just happened to be one of the most optimistic and vastly divergent from agent-based and SEIR epi models is suspect to say the least. It's important in this regard to note that, generally speaking one side of the epistemic divide goes with science and reality - and its policy decision makers generally go along with that side - the other side doesn't. So when we talk about how the selection of models and science goes, it's important to keep in mind that one side does inquiry, is reality-based, the other side - which currently occupies a lot of powerful positions including the POTUS - doesn't or worse apes science with its own version of science even though that version is not. This is imv in large part how we end up with IHME models being the fulcrum for incredibly important public health policies at the federal level. Because the selection criteria is more about whether the models in this case buttress identity and priors rather than being scientifically valid. The merchants of doubt hold more sway in one political realm than the other. This is how some deny climate, deny lung cancer, empower fossil fuels through sham science.

“the party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final most essential command.”

Carl Bergstrom, biology professor at UW, has been particularly good on this and has a book with the aptly titled "Calling Bullshit" coming out in August.

Calling Bullshit

AC's picture

Perhaps, David. From my

Perhaps, David. From my perspective, there have been numerous shortcomings and flaws in addressing the pandemic - reaching far beyond the realm of academia. In some instances, especially where caution is being urged, I'm inclined to give some benefit of the doubt given the nature of the rapidly changing circumstances and evolution in understanding of this disease. However when flaws in a projection model are used to undermine the message that wearing masks in public situations is a smart practice that could reduce the spread of the virus and save lives, I have to disagree.

fischbobber's picture

Not to pile on

It appears, that through modeling, or even her gut decision base on the plethora of data she was being asked to process, Mayor Kincannon made the right decisions to slow the spread. It's just as clear that Jacobs royally screwed up the reopen. Had it not been for the protests allowing him and out in a couple weeks, the mess that will become this town would be totally on his shoulders.

Had Jacobs advocated for masks to his warrior tribe, we might have still been able to handle whatever Covid-19 brought us this spring and summer.. After this weekend's demonstrations though, Jacobs will be able to deny culpability though and move the public official culpability to some nebulous forces that don't exist. He won't have to be accountable for the liuves he cost this town.

Right now, maybe we'll be able to handle our first wave, maybe we won't. Planning, we don't need no stinking planning. All we have to do is shut the smart woman up. /snark

jbr's picture

Best way to reduce coronavirus transmission by wearing a mask

A team of researchers in Texas and California compared Covid-19 infection rate trends in Italy and New York both before and after face masks were made mandatory. Both locations started to see infection rates flatten only after mandatory face mask measures were put in place, according to the study published Thursday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Best way to reduce coronavirus transmission is by wearing a face mask, study finds

fischbobber's picture

Thank you.

Being a misanthrope is a thankless task.

Moon's picture

States requiring masks

The article lists 13 states requiring masks in public. Here are those 13 states, sorted by the percentage of residents hospitalized (at any time) for C-19. Mortality stats are also included, along with those figures for the entire US and Tennessee.

preview_Screenshot 2020-06-20 at 12.06.34 PM_0.png

fischbobber's picture

These are total population numbers.

At this point (we're still very early in the onset of the disease) the pertinent numbers are Rfactor ( rate of transmission), hospitalization percentage and death percentage per rate of infection.

We already know the vast majority of Americans do not have Covid yet.

Once this disease has run its course, these categories will be great for comparison at a historical perspective. But let's look at Tennessee. In a month, those two numbers will be .068% and .032%. Without a translation of mortuary and hospital bed capacity into a percentage of population, the numbers are meaningless.

If you want to measure in terms of percentage of total population, then all the measurements must be translated into that measurement. For instance, that US number of hospitalizations is 229,740 and rising. We know that outbreaks move and overwhelm hospitals in areas it hits. Yet the .07 would suggest the number is insignificant. We know from the outbreaks that it is not the case. It's the same number, but the anti-maskers are swapping various views of that number and comparing apples to oranges. It's the same way people get sold time-share. What's good in the time share industry is not necessarily good public policy.

What we do know is that masks work. Covid is spread by spit and masks stop spit. It really is as simple as that. Community wide use of masks slows the spread of the virus to a degree greater than herd immunity would. The use of masks can either be a community effort based on an educated populace banding together in a common cause, it can be government mandated, or it can be ignored, like the anti-maskers wishing to infect as many as possible (the Swedish protocol) thus increasing deaths, permanent disability, financial ruin for the patients and ultimately the collapse of local governments and economies, because that's what instability does to markets. Glenn Jacobs and Martin Daniels are both on record as supporting the Swedish protocol. Glenn Jacobs and Martin Daniels are both idiots and attempted murderers at this point. If their plan works, they should be held accountable and tried for murder.

Interestingly, local anecdotal evidence suggests that, with mask use and common sense distancing, we can begin to build new normals. If we could get community use of masks normalized, we can not only get football season, we can jump the rest of the SEC and dominate for literally decades. Don't think for a second that recruits aren't paying attention to Knoxville's Covid numbers, or how we are handling the BLM changes that will be coming. After the Klan rally at Clemson, rumor has it that UT has become somewhat a destination point for recruits. The irony of the situation where the same people that claim to want a dominate football team are leading the way to destroy that very effort.

That's what happens when you elect a do-nothing libertarian wrestler who knows jack about football or government or even basic science to run your county. Elections have consequences.

Moon's picture

At least with respect to football recruits

Don't think for a second that recruits aren't paying attention to Knoxville's Covid numbers

Uh ... swing and a miss, there.

fischbobber's picture

Think so?

Look at the UT players at the BLM rally. Look at Bama's Covid situation. Look at the tweets coming out of Clemson from their players. Look at our recruiting before and since covid became an issue. You're out of touch with the kids dude. What we do and don't do as a community in dealing with covid and race relations will determine our success as a football team. And Pruitt is every bit the positive community leader that Jacobs is the incompetent fool.

Moon's picture

Yeah, I’m pretty sure

At least based on the comments of the several current, past and future UT football players at my house right now- yeah, I’m pretty confident in my comment that recruits are not monitoring Covid case counts in Knoxville. (All of them are paying for their own food, just to be clear.)

(Sorry; I couldn’t pass that one up.)

R. Neal's picture

Well, young, strong healthy

Well, young, strong healthy people apparently aren't dying from covid, so the odds are in their favor. About their meemaws, though...

Moon's picture

Re Meemaw and football recruits

R Neal wrote: Well, young, strong healthy people apparently aren't dying from covid, so the odds are in their favor. About their meemaws, though...

You are obviously quite right, Neal. My comment was in response to the silly claim that oversized 16- and 17- year-old high school students are monitoring Knoxville's C-19 cases as a part of their recruiting process.

Back to players infecting Meemaw ... The "Meemaws" who are currently at risk are adult coaches, trainers and equipment personnel working closely with players in football complexes around the country. Granny is safe from her oversized grandson because players won't return home until December.

In many ways, the players are better off having returned to campus. They have structure, medical staff in the complex and they can't infect at-risk family members.

fischbobber's picture

Better off

They are better off as long as our community spread of covid stays at a low rate. If an outbreak occurs, like Mayor Glenn Jacobs, Representative Martin Daniel and their merry band of idiot followers are trying to make happen, the best thing for the players is to send them home to shelter in place and hope for next year.

Being ahead of the covid situation and being at the forefront of the BLM situation are the biggest sociological breaks our town has given the football team since Doug Dickey and integration. Just because our local politicians are too stupid to see it, and the subsequent problems a large outbreak will bring to our ball team doesn't not make it so.

As to the staff, masks work. If they are not proceeding in a manner to procure and institute proper mask and distancing techniques, then any in team spread is on them. We know yelling, screaming and singing send out more spit. Wear a mask and use a bullhorn.

Maybe you're right. Maybe none of the players are not aware of the disease, how it spreads through communities, and how easily it's carried how to their mothers and grandparents. Maybe they don't know that the long term effects of having and recovering from this disease, for people in their age group, will be the loss of enough of their God-given talent ( their 4.3 speed goes to 5.1, no big deal, right? ) and weight loss and chronic fatigue, but they're coming to college, and no matter how stupid and out of touch our recruits are, as you claim them to be, they will quickly find out that the SMART adults in charge are taking this seriously. But hey, they're not paying attention. Be right and chuckle it up. The 30-40% of the players that show no symptoms beyond a slower forty time should be more than enough to get us through the season.

Mike Knapp's picture

Why do HC workers wear N95 masks?

or face shields?

R. Neal's picture

They don't, unless they are

They don't, unless they are working directly with covid patients.

Mike Knapp's picture

Yes, but why?

Yes, but why?

R. Neal's picture

Obvious reasons when working

Obvious reasons when working with covid patients. Or was that a rhetorical question? :)

P.S. All other staff, visitors, etc. wear surgical masks at all times, and nurses wear gloves that they change between patients.

Mike Knapp's picture

The PS

was where I was. All PT’s and patients at my wife’s PT clinic wear nonclinical masks, sister says no one allowed into UTMC without such a mask. Now back to mediating a discussion between my 10 & 12 yo about whether juicy fruit is better than big red with a side of whether call of duty is rly just the same game released every year with minor modifications...

R. Neal's picture

sister says no one allowed

sister says no one allowed into UTMC without such a mask.

They also screen all visitors by taking temp and asking questions about symptoms, contacts, travel, etc. They also only allow one visitor at a time and require check-in and check-out at the screening stations. In ICU, covid patients are isolated in a separate part of the floor. In the ER, patients with symptoms or suspected exposure have big red warning signs on the door about ppe, gloves in a tray on the door, and only staff allowed and they were wearing masks, shields, and those disposable coveralls and booties.

In other words, they are taking this stuff seriously and are amazing. Nobody whines or complains except the occasional uninformed visitor bozo at check-in.

fischbobber's picture

Masks work.

Modern right wing politics is an incomprehensible mumbo-jumbo of semantics, anymore. One poorly designed flawed study or opinion should invalidate hundreds of years worth of science. The current right wing argument against masks goes along these lines, "Because I have evidence that masks may not be 100% effective, I should ignore the mountains of evidence showing that masks control the spread of covid more effectively than any other technique."

The justification? "My ignorance is equal to your knowledge because the constitution says so."

Factchecker's picture

Wuuut?

That percentage listing for states is completely wackadoodle (to use a word a right-wing friend likes to use). It doesn't show anything about infections and deaths over time, nor does it address population densities and many other data that health and science professionals need in order to really know anything. Whether masks help or not is one such metric that matters.

It also shows low percentages that trivialize the number of souls lost (over 117,000 in less than a third of a year--or about double the number of U.S. military who died in Vietnam over about 20 years).

It looks like that was pieced together by a low-level GOP operative, to perpetuate the pandemic in this country in order to extend the power of malevolent and corrupt Republicans.

jbr's picture

KAT driver threatened with box cutter over mask

The driver told officers the man became irate and threatened her with a box cutter after she asked him to put on a face mask to board the bus.

Man threatens KAT bus driver with box cutter after she asked him to put on a mask

BoB W.'s picture

unity

Had to go to the Dr. last FRI & as we left, the parking attendant - an older lady - wasn't wearing a mask. We asked her if she had any. "No" she replied, so we gave her a baggie that had 6 to 8 masks. She cried. God bless her.

Our neighbor has had a part of both of her lungs removed due to cancer. She had no masks. We gave her some N95 masks that I already had a number of before the pandemic, for use in my shop when sanding, grinding, painting, etc.. We also bought masks, gloves & toilet paper for my niece & my wife's brother.

If it is possible, we should be helping friends, family, neighbors, and YES - strangers. There is strength in unity & as they say, what goes around, comes around.

Furthermore - "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thy self"
Words to live by.

fischbobber's picture

Masks at Weigels

10 packs for $14.99. They're high, but available.

bizgrrl's picture

What kind of masks? Which

What kind of masks? Which Weigels?

fischbobber's picture

Weigels at Callahan.

They were disposable surgical/paper fiber masks.

jbr's picture

See how a mask affects how a cough travels

BoB W.'s picture

HI $ masks

Today at a local convenience store in Rockford, TN (Four Corners Market) they had masks at the check out counter for $2 each. OUCH!

jbr's picture

~20,000 teens in Georgia have received their driver license ...

... without a road test

All of them got their licenses without taking an official road test. It's Georgia's way of handling the backlog of the thousands of road test requests that have been put on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Nearly 20,000 teens in Georgia have received their driver licenses without a road test

jbr's picture

Customers shoot 2 OKC McDonald's employees

Police told KOCO 5 that two people entered the lobby of the McDonald's near Southwest 89th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, where employees informed them that the dining room was closed because of safety precautions surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. At some point, a gun was produced and two male employees were shot, police said.

Customers shoot 2 OKC McDonald's employees after being told dining room was closed, police say

jbr's picture

Most coronavirus in some states are in prisons and nursing homes

In Louisiana, more than 30% of the state's coronavirus deaths are nursing home residents. In New Hampshire, long-term care facility residents make up nearly 80% of the state's cases.

The most alarming coronavirus numbers in some states are in prisons and nursing homes

jbr's picture

Silent hypoxia: Covid-19 patients who should be gasping for air

Typically, these patients have experienced some Covid-19 symptoms for two to seven days before they show up at the hospital complaining of sudden chest tightness or an inability to breathe deeply, said Dr. Richard Levitan, who's been an emergency room physician for some 30 years.

Silent hypoxia: Covid-19 patients who should be gasping for air but aren't

jbr's picture

'quarantine greenhouses' so diners can eat while social distanci

Mediamatic ETEN, a restaurant in Amsterdam, is offering a four-course vegetarian menu for diners -- served to guests while they sit in their own personal quarantine greenhouses.

Waiters wear gloves and face shields to alleviate any risk of infections, the restaurant confirmed to CNN. They also use long boards to bring dishes into the greenhouses to diners.

This restaurant in Amsterdam introduced 'quarantine greenhouses' so diners can eat while social distancing

jbr's picture

Shortage of needles, syringes looms in race to develop COVID-19

Currently, the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) contains about 15 million needles and syringes, about 2% of what will be needed, according to Bright’s complaint.

Shortage of needles, syringes looms in race to develop COVID-19 vaccine

Supply chain headache? Hundreds of millions of syringes will be needed to vaccinate U.S.

fischbobber's picture

Some thoughts to consider

(link...)

Got it? Good. Read it, know it, live it.

jbr's picture

Went to restaurant in

Went to restaurant in Kingston Pike/Cedar Bluff area Sunday evening. None of kitchen staff nor some other staff preparing or handling food had masks. We got up and left. Is it a requirement for them to wear a mask?

R. Neal's picture

Following are the guidelines

Following are the guidelines from KCHD. Hard to tell the answer to your question, but it looks like the answer is no. Maybe KCHD can answer if you call them?

• When 6 feet of physical distancing cannot be
maintained, employees and patrons must wear
face coverings.
• Sanitize surfaces and items between users.
• Treat every patron and employee as if they are
potentially infectious.
• Drinking-only establishments are not open for
onsite consumption in Phase One.
• Food truck parks are not open in Phase One.
• Curbside pickup and delivery options should still
be offered, when possible.
• Restaurants can open only with tables spaced to
allow for at least 6 feet of physical distancing
between groups of patrons, at a maximum of 50%
capacity based on seating capacity. Physical
distancing of table spacing applies to both indoor
and outdoor seating.
• A maximum of 6 people per table, with the
understanding that restaurants have more than
10 total patrons at one time, face coverings
cannot be worn while eating, and physical
distancing is intermittently broken during the
delivery of food items from the kitchen.
• Physical distancing of at least 6 feet must be
maintained in both the kitchen and dining room.
Diners cannot wait inside or congregate while
waiting.
• The bar/counter section within a restaurant is not
open for seating or standing due to the tendency
to congregate and because of the danger of
respiratory droplets landing on the service area.
Alcohol can be served from the bar in other
seated areas of the establishment.
• Self-service is not permitted (for example, salad
bars, buffets, beverage service and shared
condiments) due to the use of communal serving
instruments and surfaces.
• Condiments must be single-serve, provided by
request only (not tabletop) and cannot be reused.
• Menu boards, single use menus or sanitizing of
menus between each use is required.
• Use rolled silverware/napkins stored in sealed
bins (cloth face covering and gloves should be
worn by staff while rolling silverware in a
designated sanitary area)
• No live music.

Factchecker's picture

Risks and how to avoid them, found via Kevin Drum

Apologies if this is posted elsewhere here on this or another thread, but this looks like good data we all can use.

(link...)

Mike Knapp's picture

What’s going on at city County building? Wearing masks also?

Via Yamiche Alcindor - CONFIRMED: The White House has directed all West Wing staff to wear masks at all times in the building, except when they are at their own desks.

jbr's picture

Disney parks in US will 'likely' require face masks

It will be interesting to see what they can come up with that will allow for them to reopen.

The CEO of the Walt Disney Company said this week that face masks for guests and workers will "likely" be one of the coronavirus precautions put in place when the company's U.S. parks reopen.

Disney parks in US will 'likely' require face masks when they reopen, CEO says

jmcnair's picture

That thieving rat!

With the prices they charge for admission, they should supply branded masks to each visitor with a happy Mickey/Minnie or Goofy face on it.

bizgrrl's picture

Excellent!

Excellent!

jbr's picture

Inmates tried to infect themselves with the coronavirus

The Los Angeles County jail inmates had one goal in mind: get infected with the novel coronavirus so they could be released from custody. And they were going to do it together.

Inmates tried to infect themselves with the coronavirus to get early release, Los Angeles County sheriff says

jbr's picture

Uber to use facial recognition tech to determine if masks worn

Uber drivers will have to take a selfie with their mask on and submit it within the app for verification before they can begin a ride.

The Uber app already uses face-scanning technology to verify a driver’s ID before starting a ride, so this new mask verification is built off that framework.

Uber to use facial recognition tech to determine if drivers are wearing masks

jbr's picture

How Uber rides are about to change

In a blog post on Wednesday, Khosrowshahi said the new Covid-19 changes will be in effect through the end of June, and then will be revisited based on local conditions.

Face masks and mandatory selfies for drivers: How Uber rides are about to change

jbr's picture

Environments with increased risk of spreading coronavirus

...which environments have an increased risk of spreading coronavirus

Biologist: Avoid these places to protect against Covid-19

jbr's picture

The Doctor Will Zoom You Now: BlueCross covering online

Marking a seismic shift in medicine, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee is fully embracing telehealth, announcing Thursday that from now it will cover online medical consultations with in-network health care providers.

The Doctor Will Zoom You Now: BlueCross commits to covering online medical consults from now on

jbr's picture

Humans are not herds

Ryan said the term "herd immunity" emerged from veterinary epidemiology, typically involving business decisions of whether to let animals die for the overall health of a herd.

"An individual animal in that sense doesn't matter, from the perspective of the brutal economics of that decision-making," Ryan said.

Can herd immunity help stop the coronavirus? Experts warn it's not that easy.

bizgrrl's picture

May 17, 2020, Texas reports

May 17, 2020, Texas reports largest single-day jump in coronavirus cases.

Texas reported 1,801 new coronavirus cases Saturday, reportedly marking the state’s largest single-day jump since the start of the coronavirus crisis.

The Texas Department of State Health Services said 734 of the new cases are from Potter and Randall counties.

“These counties’ new cases are largely from targeted testing of employees at meat plants in the area. More test results from plants are expected,” it tweeted.

Midori Barstow's picture

US lockdown protests may have

US lockdown protests may have spread virus widely, cellphone data suggests

Devices associated with protesters travelled up to hundreds of miles after rallies where few precautions were taken

(link...)

jbr's picture

He thought the coronavirus was 'a fake crisis.'

A Florida man who thought the coronavirus was "a fake crisis" has changed his mind after he and his wife contracted COVID-19.

He thought the coronavirus was 'a fake crisis.' Then he contracted it and changed his mind.

jbr's picture

A spike of on May 18 of new

Mike Knapp's picture

Kai Kupferschmidt in Science

Kai Kupferschmidt in Science Mag - Why do some COVID-19 patients infect many others, whereas most don’t spread the virus at all?

That’s why in addition to R, scientists use a value called the dispersion factor (k), which describes how much a disease clusters. The lower k is, the more transmission comes from a small number of people. In a seminal 2005 Nature paper, Lloyd-Smith and co-authors estimated that SARS—in which superspreading played a major role—had a k of 0.16. The estimated k for MERS, which emerged in 2012, is about 0.25. In the flu pandemic of 1918, in contrast, the value was about one, indicating that clusters played less of a role.

Estimates of k for SARS-CoV-2 vary. In January, Julien Riou and Christian Althaus at the University of Bern simulated the epidemic in China for different combinations of R and k and compared the outcomes with what had actually taken place. They concluded that k for COVID-19 is somewhat higher than for SARS and MERS. That seems about right, says Gabriel Leung, a modeler at the University of Hong Kong. “I don’t think this is quite like SARS or MERS, where we observed very large superspreading clusters,” Leung says. “But we are certainly seeing a lot of concentrated clusters where a small proportion of people are responsible for a large proportion of infections.” But in a recent preprint, Adam Kucharski of LSHTM estimated that k for COVID-19 is as low as 0.1. “Probably about 10% of cases lead to 80% of the spread,” Kucharski says.

Treehouse's picture

Today on NPR

Yes, I heard a small number of people can infect a huge number of people. Such as a grocery store worker and what does this mean for a waiter in a restaurant. And in case you hadn't heard, Calhouns sucks.

Mike Knapp's picture

What’s up with Calhouns?

*

Treehouse's picture

From Facebook

And there was another from Chesapeake's that I can't find right now.

Diandra Heck
Yesterday at 11:01 AM ·
I have worked for Calhoun's for 7 years. And yesterday I got fired because I refused to break the phase one guidelines of serving customers at the bar. It was either do what they say or I don't have a job there. So instead of breaking the guidelines, I had no other choice but to leave. These guidelines were set for the safety of our workers. Copper Cellar restaurants do not care about that at all. They are willing to terminate workers like myself in order to follow their OWN guidelines that was given to them by the owner of the company. Here I have a photo of the bar last night. Today they moved all the chairs because they are expecting the health department to show up and they don't want to get caught for breaking the guidelines. Its funny... I spent 7 years with this company and they let me go for not breaking the law and for standing up for the safety of my health and my families health. I left in a respectful manner, I did not cause a scene like they are telling everyone there, that is a lie. I left with my head held high, and the fact that I knew I did not do anything wrong. please share this post and get the word out because this is wrong

R. Neal's picture

Compass has a report.

Compass has a report. Complaints posted on facebook by an employee at the Turkey Creek Calhouns and a manager at Calhouns on the river. They say the restaurants aren't complying with distancing and other guidelines. The health dept. said compliance is voluntary and there is no enforcement, and suggested people just avoid places that aren't complying. Copper Cellar/Calhouns declined to comment.

Compass: (link...)

jbr's picture

I dont know all the places

I dont know all the places owned by the folks that own Calhoun's.

Walking around downtown it looked like the restaurants were spacing people and employees wearing masks. If I go in a restaurant and the employees aren't wearing masks, I leave.
It looked like the Stock and Barrel had folks crammed too close together in the outside seating area.

It surprises me how few people wear masks downtown, and in general. At least it seems you should have one to put on when you go inside. I saw a pregnant woman walking downtown without a mask. That seems like a questionable decision.

jbr's picture

This is how sharing dinner table items can make you sick

Closer look at how quickly germs can spread in restaurants through a science experiment designed to track germ droplets.

This is how sharing dinner table items can make you sick

jbr's picture

CDC Opening America Up Again

jbr's picture

Sweden is still nowhere near 'herd immunity'

Sweden has revealed that despite adopting more relaxed measures to control coronavirus, only 7.3% of people in Stockholm had developed the antibodies needed to fight the disease by late April.

well below the 70-90% needed to create "herd immunity" in a population.

Sweden has now had 32,172 cases and 3,871 deaths, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University.

Sweden is still nowhere near 'herd immunity,' even though it didn't go into lockdown

jbr's picture

Coronavirus in the U.S.: Latest Map and Case Count

Trousdale County in Tennessee by far has the most in the list "Hot spots: Counties with the highest number of cases per resident" in the entire US, as of May 21.

Lake County has the 5th most, Bledsoe County the 8th most.

Coronavirus in the U.S.: Latest Map and Case Count

barker's picture

One Word:

Prisons.

fischbobber's picture

Any word?

From Morgan County.

barker's picture

TDOC has been doing

TDOC has been doing comprehensive testing of its prisons, but I don't know the schedule off the top of my head. As of Tuesday, Morgan County had only seven active cases. That tells me the correctional facility tests haven't come back yet.

fischbobber's picture

Thanks.

That's what I thought.

jbr's picture

Hair stylist worked while symptomatic, exposed dozens

A hair stylist in Springfield, Missouri, exposed as many as 91 people to coronavirus after working at a salon for eight days while symptomatic, health officials said Friday.

He warned residents who recently visited the same locations as the stylist, including a Dairy Queen, a Walmart and a CVS pharmacy, to look for COVID-19 symptoms and isolate themselves if they develop.

Missouri hair stylist with coronavirus worked while symptomatic, exposed dozens of clients

jbr's picture

COVID-19 is costing drug cartels millions of dollars

Bodner said California’s stay-at-home order has made it more difficult for traffickers to launder money and move around the city unseen.

“When there’s less hay in the haystack, it’s easier to find the needle,” he added. “It’s caused the drug cartels and money launderers to take more risks, and that’s where we can capitalize.”

COVID-19 is costing drug cartels millions of dollars

jbr's picture

Virginia requires everyone to wear masks in public spaces

Everyone over age 10 will be required to wear face masks starting Friday inside public spaces in Virginia, an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, Gov. Ralph Northam said Tuesday.

Masks to be required inside public places starting Friday, Northam says

fischbobber's picture

Good.

It's the smart thing to do. I blame myself for thinking we had a competent enough government to get us something in the way of football.

jbr's picture

Increase in positive Knox County virus cases

Knox County has seen a "statistically significant" increase in positive COVID-19 cases for several days, a signal that's prompting more health employees to return to help with contact tracing to track the potential spread of the virus, Health Department Director Dr. Martha Buchanan said Wednesday.

Increase in positive Knox County virus cases draws Health Department's scrutiny

jbr's picture

Kroger: Three workers test positive for coronavirus Cedar Bluff

I started going to Publix at University Commons almost exclusively a month or so ago because all employees wore masks and they are on top of buggy and basket cleaning. I wasn't seeing that diligence at Krogers and Food City.

Grocer Kroger says three workers at its Cedar Bluff store on Kingston Pike have tested positive for COVID-19.

Kroger: Three workers test positive for coronavirus at Cedar Bluff store in Knoxville

bizgrrl's picture

Someone posted about this on

Someone posted about this on Twitter a couple of days ago. Been waiting for the new report.

Also heard on Twitter that there were some cases reported at the Lowes in East Knoxville. Waiting on an official report.

Yes, we have noticed Publix has done a better job. Hope it continues.

Factchecker's picture

Context

Of course, we're dealing with an Executive branch of the federal government that is fact-averse, science averse, averse to proactive reasoning and studies that would guide us in such sudden crises, and which shut down virtually all budgeted efforts to learn and prepare for these things ahead of time. Even George W. Bush understood the value of doing the science.

So absence such preparation and while we have no leadership or competence at leading, and confronted with a mystery virus that academia is scrambling to learn new, different, and sometimes seemingly contradictory things about, what should we be doing instead?

Should every science study that gets something wrong about this novel virus result in punishment, defunding, etc. of the institution behind its publication? That would have a tragic and chilling effect. Unless there was intended fraud, which I don't believe is being alleged here, that would be just another self-inflicting wound to a country where expertise is already being dangerously but systematically dismantled by political right-wing ideology.

R. Neal's picture

The federal government (at

The federal government (at least the executive part, that, you know, executes government policy, programs and functions) is no longer functioning. Health care, pubic health, regulatory agencies, even the Post Office have been politicized and weaponized. Information is no longer reliable. No help is coming. Only lies.

Sadly, the incompetence and indifference is trickling down to Red State governments and even local governments.

Let's hope that the defense department is still functioning on at least some basic level of readiness. We are vulnerable.

Factchecker's picture

A red light signifies the

A red light signifies the trends are not moving towards benchmark attainment and may indicate mid-phase adjustments need to be made, according to the health department.

That last sentence is interesting. I wonder what the county mayor would like to do at this point. Follow the plan or continue reopening at the same or quicker pace?

jbr's picture

Where U.S. coronavirus cases are on the rise

Several southern U.S. states reported sharp increases in COVID-19 infections, with Alabama, South Carolina and Virginia all seeing new cases rise 35% or more in the week ended May 31 compared with the prior week, according to a Reuters analysis.

Where U.S. coronavirus cases are on the rise

R. Neal's picture

Let's also recognize AC for

Let's also recognize AC for making an early, tough, personally and financially painful decision to cancel Big Ears in the interest of public health and safety. And, if I recall correctly, he did it before any official government action or guidance.

fischbobber's picture

Great Point!

Great communities need great leaders. Both Randy and AC fit that bill.

Roger Fleenor's picture

Let's also recognize AC

Indeed.

Roger Fleenor's picture

Let's also recognize AC

Indeed.

AC's picture

Thanks, Randy (and

Thanks, Randy (and fischbobber and Roger). I appreciate that.

It was a difficult decision - we had, as always, put heart and soul into the 2020 festival, and it was selling out for the first time ever over two weeks in advance. It was amazing how fast things were moving that week however. What seemed sadly but clearly necessary to us (but not everyone) on Tuesday night was painfully evident to all within a day or two. By Thursday, concerts all across the county were being canceled and by the weekend venues everywhere were closing.

We had the benefit of a lot information - European friends, colleagues and artists were giving us almost minute-by-minute updates on what was going there and what was clearly coming here. Some American artists were returning from European tours with their heads spinning because things were changing so fast. I also have family - my sister-in-law and our two nieces who are all in medical profession in Germany - were providing additional information and insight.

It has been an extraordinary experience watching this pandemic unfold - and a sad and frustrating one to witness the lack of thoughtful, strong, intelligent, unified leadership here in the USA in addressing it. We still have some bold and exciting plans and hopes to return in early 2021, but my greatest fear is that the current strategy will backfire and extend the pain even further. I hope I'm wrong. Thanks again for the acknowledgment.

fischbobber's picture

A bit of irony........

I see mandated masks for a lot of business models, including festivals and entertainment.

The longer our county mayor keeps being a spoiled brat, the longer it will take various businessmen, like promoters, to get safe business plans up and sell the changes to an audience and customer base. Nobody wants to come somewhere where everybody's sick.

Moon's picture

What if everybody's sick, but no one knows it?

"Nobody wants to come somewhere where everybody's sick."

What if everybody's sick, but no one knows it?

The return of football players to campuses will provide useful data. At P5 schools you will have 100 young, presumably healthy males, from across the country. None (few?) are C19 symptomatic, but the entire population will be tested. It will give us some insight into current infection rates among a population that (from my personal knowledge) has been generally non-compliant with any mitigation efforts.

AC's picture

unless it's a masked ball, I

unless it's a masked ball, I don't see masks generally catching on at festivals and concerts. And not social distancing either. Concerts and especially festivals are social events. While there are a few innovative ideas being explored short term, the reality is that festivals and concerts as we know them will return when people have reasonable assurances that they aren't risking their health in attending. It's likely to be a while. I do remain hopeful.

fischbobber's picture

Didn't know if you saw this or not.

(link...)

Brushy Mountain. This weekend.

fischbobber's picture

You know.....

I saw that on my first go round looking for a link to share with that news, and I saw the link you posted and dismissed it quickly because of the skyscraper in the back ground. Then I hit your link and looked at it again and realized, damn, that's a guard tower.

Wonder how many we had there from Knoxville? Looks like a superspreader.

Factchecker's picture

Good resource

Anyone not following Andy Slavitt on this subject should check out his efforts. He also has a great podcast, In the Bubble.

jbr's picture

Florida's surge in coronavirus cases. But there's good news ...

First, the bad news: The number of new coronavirus cases reported in Florida each day has increased an average of roughly 46% over the past week, according to a national tracking website.

But the percentage of coronavirus test results that turn out to be positive is only 4%...

The World Health Organization has recommended governments stay at a "testing positivity" rate of 5% or lower for at least 14 days before reopening.

Just in time for summer, Florida's seeing a surge in coronavirus cases. But there's good news, too

Mike Knapp's picture

America is giving up

Alexis Madrigal & Robinson Meyer in the Atlantic - America Is Giving Up on the Pandemic

Americans have not fully grasped that we are not doing what countries that have returned to normal have done. Some countries have almost completely suppressed the virus. Others had large outbreaks, took intense measures, and have seen life return to normal. Americans, meanwhile, never stayed at home to the degree that most Europeans have, according to mobility data from Apple and Google. Our version of the spring lockdown looked more like Sweden’s looser approach than like the more substantial measures in Italy, or even the United Kingdom and France. Swedish public-health officials have acknowledged that this approach may not have been the best path forward.

bizgrrl's picture

Very sad.

Very sad.

Bill Lyons's picture

It is too early for science to explain the virus's spread

It is hard to escape the fact that there are some real gaps in knowledge in regard to community spread of Covid-19 and the efficacy of policy. The states have been labs to some degree and the results are not showing what one might have hypothesized from conventional wisdom. A couple of months ago many were pointing to Kentucky as shutting things down more thoroughly and earlier that we did in Tennessee. Also two states with Republican governors - Ohio and Georgia took very different steps with Georgia's governor being lambasted as callously opening too much and too soon. But as the table below demonstrates the results don't necessarily support the hypotheses implied by the above. Tennessee has fewer deaths per capita than Kentucky. Likewise Georgia fares no worse than Ohio.

NBC: Corona Virus Deaths by State

It is too early for the data collection, hypothesis testing, and theory building that comprise the scientific method. I argued a month ago that we had no good models and that errors such as those that Moon cites may well lead to a collective eye roll when we are warned of a second wave.

Scientists need to explain models to build trust

The model building has been rushed, premature, and, not surprisingly, quite inaccurate. The assumptions change rapidly. Any modeling depends on capturing an almost infinite number of human decisions. The fact is that nobody has a handle on this.

I think Covid-19 is very serious. As a member of a vulnerable population I choose to wear a mask and carefully practice social distancing. But the science is not there yet to reliably guide policy. I find that especially troubling because trust in science is undercut when what is claimed to be science produces results so far from the mark. The last thing we need is to unwittingly undercut the scientific method as the basis of our knowledge of how are world functions.

fischbobber's picture

All good points.

Richard Briggs posts on facebook, they are a must read for trying to figure out both what's going on, and what direction to take.

It appears that our positive cases for Knoxville have skewed toward younger people. Near as I can tell, this is what accounts for our outstandingly low mortality rate. We have also avoided outbreak in Knoxville in our jails and assisted living facilities. In other words, by avoiding outbreaks in vulnerable pockets, we thus far have been able to avoid both deaths and hospitalizations. This is not just a good thing, it is a great thing. It is also something that could literally change overnight. Ignoring the problem and pretending it will go away on its own is not only bad science, it is bad public policy.

I don't know if I would credit the more successful responses to this crisis a result of great scientific modeling or just common sense and luck. I think there's doubt that if our luck in Knox County doesn't hold, there's a great chance that current county policy could quite likely destroy the Knox County economy for a generation. By sticking with our current laissez-faire, hands off policy of come what may, as it relates to covid-19, we expose ourselves to not only known risk, but to the risks of the unknown. Setting our community up to being the petrie dish of the next really crappy effect of this virus shouldn't be the goal of any of us.

As such, now would be the time to be proactive. Essential stores should declare whether they are mask only, or mask optional. The County should provide a forum for mask-only stores to advertise the in business, in a free county financed web site. Mayor Jacobs has declared us prisoners of the state by not affording us low risk avenues for essential behavior, and those in the private sector that choose to step up to serve this need should have access to forum. And those of us sentenced to our house or our health should have an option. I don't want to do business with people whose first priority is not the health and well being of their customers and associates. These people should have free access to forum. It is is the general welfare of our community. And they are doing the work government is mandated to do.

Covid is serious and right now Knoxville is an anomaly. If someone knows why, they certainly aren't advertising the information. For our community to come through this together we must find common ground, and common purpose. We must each do our part, but beyond that we must elevate the level of acknowledgement that those around us get for doing theirs. From local, to state, to federal we must demand leadership from our elected officials and hold them accountable for listening to the scientists and articulating exactly the course of action we're taking for exactly the reasons.

Mike Knapp's picture

Gaps in scientific knowledge don't explain the COVID reduxn gaps

But the science is not there yet to reliably guide policy.

Let me humbly change that for ya Bill - the science is there to reliably guide policy.

I would agree that there have been and certainly continue to be gaps in scientific knowledge about COVID. Some of these gaps have closed as the scientific community grinds away at this serious public health issue - masks work. Others still remain at large - why and how does blood type matter? Here's one place to check in on the status of the science where papers are free. And here's the indispensable Derek Lowe who writes from the leading edge of treatments.

The fact is that nobody has a handle on this.

However the general thrust from above - that reducing COVID spread remains a mystery because of a supposed gray area in which the scientific method has been inadequately applied, or perhaps because there is not enough data to apply it - is a concept to take issue with. The policies that are supported by science and adopted by countries with policy makers like yourself who appreciate science and deploy its findings have seen consistent reduction in the spread of COVID.

Masks work, testing/tracing/isolating work and paying people to stay home so that they don't spread at work works.

Maybe your comments about the scientific method concern themselves with more about the predictive value of models than whether science, specifically the science of public health, as an endeavor can reduce COVID spread. In this regard I would agree that the models are only as good as the data that are input into them and that also some policy makers mosdef cherry-picked some models over others. We can see for example how they've improved and changed over time for example comparing the IHME vs Los Alamos versions here.

In sum, if "nobody" (translated - all ppl and policy makers) doesn't have a handle on the spread then how do we explain this image below? In Europe they're watching us with alarm. Why?

I hope that you, being in close proximity to power, would advise those with decision-making abilities to not throw their hands up or give them cover. Rather I hope you would say that science can guide their hands and play the opposite role by remaining steadfast in the belief that the science, although always evolving with new data, gives us a solid basis for the public health decisions that have driven the spread to low levels from New Zealand and South Korea to the recovering hotspot of the EU.

USA population = 331 million
EU population = 446 million

jbr's picture

Virus. smirus, Las Vegas opens

jbr's picture

Where U.S. coronavirus cases are on the rise

Among others for the week ending June 7, 2020 ...

Total Cases Per 100k New Cases 1-week change
Tennessee 26,381 386 3,375 +18.0%

Where U.S. coronavirus cases are on the rise

jbr's picture

"By attending the Rally, you

"By attending the Rally, you and any guests voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19 and agree not to hold Donald J. Trump for President, Inc.; BOK Center; ASM Global; or any of their affiliates, directors, officers, employees, agents, contractors, or volunteers liable for any illness or injury," the disclaimer reads.

Trump campaign says it can't be held liable if rally attendees contract coronavirus

bizgrrl's picture

Whatta ya gonna do? It's kind

Whatta ya gonna do? It's kind of funny, but then sad. Do you think the attendees just don't care? Sure they'll sign the waiver just to be with Trump.

jbr's picture

Seems like a natural occasion

Seems like a natural occasion to do well organized, thorough, contact tracking

I wonder if they have the intention to do so?

mjw's picture

Donor data

Only if the contact is to ask for a check.

jbr's picture

Steroid drug hailed as 'breakthrough' for seriously ill COVID-19

A cheap and widely-used steroid called dexamethasone has become the first drug shown to be able to save the lives of COVID-19 patients in what scientists said is a “major breakthrough” in the coronavirus pandemic

Steroid drug hailed as 'breakthrough' for seriously ill COVID-19 patients

jbr's picture

Sevier County's COVID-19 cases are rising. What does that mean?

No one was wearing masks; hardly anyone was social distancing. Meanwhile, the confirmed cases of COVID-19 jumped by 23 on Saturday to a total of 382.

"The people who aren't wearing masks, they're risking their lives and ours," said Betty Holms of Sevierville. "You've just got to stay away from the public and be smart."

Sevier County's COVID-19 cases are rising. What does that mean?

jbr's picture

Washington state makes face masks mandatory ...

The governor of Washington state on Tuesday ordered residents to wear face masks in public as officials across the country sought new means to control the coronavirus pandemic while easing clamp-downs on residents and reopening the economy.

Washington state makes face masks mandatory as some states see new coronavirus surge

Washington becomes the latest state to mandate wearing masks in public

jbr's picture

Angry residents erupt at meeting over new mask rule

Residents of Palm Beach County in Florida erupted in anger at a commissioner's meeting after an unanimous vote to make masks mandatory.

Angry residents erupt at meeting over new mask rule

jbr's picture

North Carolina say they won't enforce the state's mask mandate

Three sheriffs in North Carolina have declared that they will not be enforcing Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper's statewide mask mandate despite a growing number of coronavirus cases.

Several sheriffs in North Carolina say they won't enforce the state's mask mandate

jbr's picture

Face mask debate turns fierce

jbr's picture

Last 7 days 36 states have showed an upward trend

The rethinking of how to safely reopen the US comes as 36 states have showed an upward trend in average new daily cases -- an increase of at least 10% -- over the last seven days, as of Tuesday, according to data from Johns Hopkins.

These states are: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Two states saw average daily cases decline more than 10% over those seven days: New Jersey and Rhode Island.

Many states hit pause on reopening but experts say the spread of coronavirus is now hard to control

jbr's picture

Best DIY face mask material, quilting cotton beats bandana

Researchers at Florida Atlantic University have experimented with different materials and styles of non-medical masks and found that a well-fitted stitched mask made from two layers of quilting fabric was the most effective in stopping the spread of droplets from emulated coughs and sneezes.

They found that droplets from a simulated uncovered cough were able to travel more than 8 feet; with a bandana they traveled 3 feet, with a folded cotton handkerchief, they traveled 1 foot, 3 inches; and with the cone-style mask, droplets traveled about 8 inches. With the stitched-quilting fabric mask, they traveled 2.5 inches.

The best DIY face mask material and fit? Quilting cotton beats bandana, new study suggests

jbr's picture

NY, NJ and CT expand quarantine advisories for travelers from 8

Ahead of the July Fourth weekend, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut on Tuesday expanded travel advisories requiring people arriving from eight additional southern and midwestern states to quarantine for 14 days.

As of Tuesday, the Democratic governors from the tri-state area are requiring self-quarantine for travelers from: Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Nevada, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Utah. The requirement was first announced for eight states last week.

NY, NJ and CT expand quarantine advisories for travelers from 8 more states with high coronavirus rates

jbr's picture

See ways innovators are making masks worth your while

See how innovators are improving face masks so that preventing coronavirus is not the only thing they do

See ways innovators are making masks worth your while

jbr's picture

Goldman Sachs says they (face masks) could help save the economy

"Our analysis suggests that the economic benefit from a face mask mandate and increased face mask usage could be sizable," Hatzius wrote.

Trump says masks are a 'double-edged sword.' Goldman Sachs says they could help save the economy

Reducing the spread of the virus through mask-wearing, the analysts found, could be a substitute for strict lockdown measures that would otherwise shave 5%—or $1 trillion—off the U.S. GDP.

A National Mask Mandate Could Save The U.S. Economy $1 Trillion, Goldman Sachs Says

R. Neal's picture

JPMorgan analyzed data from

(link...)

JPMorgan analyzed data from 30 million Chase cardholders and Johns Hopkins University’s case tracker and found that higher restaurant spending in a state predicted a rise in new infections there three weeks later.

In-person restaurant spending was “particularly predictive.”

Conversely, higher spending at supermarkets predicted a slower spread of the virus.

Mike Knapp's picture

That’s a solid,

Would love to see that split out with a “bars” category and rerun

R. Neal's picture

Mexico building their own wall?

Mexican border states raise new concern about Americans bringing coronavirus south

As cases have increased in Southern California, Arizona and Texas, Mexican border states have increasingly come to see the outbreak in the United States as their biggest threat in controlling the epidemic.

..

On Thursday, the Mexican government said it would be installing “sanitary filters,” where travelers from the United States will have their temperatures checked at several border crossings. Those checkpoints have “the goal of protecting the health of the Mexican population, particularly those in the border states,” said a statement from the Mexico Foreign Ministry.

jbr's picture

GOP governor: I opened the bars too soon

Crowds continue to pack bars around the US as coronavirus continues to spread.

GOP governor: I opened the bars too soon

jbr's picture

Various states post daily COVID-19 records

The latest case numbers in Florida, which has yet to report statewide hospitalizations, surpassed the highest daily tally reported by any European county during the height of the coronavirus outbreak there.

In Texas, meanwhile, the number of new cases rose by a record 8,258 on Saturday. North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Alaska, Missouri, Idaho and Alabama all registered new daily highs on Friday.

Despite the rising number of infections, the average daily U.S. death toll has gradually declined in recent weeks, reflecting the growing proportion of positive tests among younger, healthier people less prone to severe illness when infected.

Florida, Texas post daily COVID-19 records as 'positivity' rates climb

jbr's picture

Georgia Tech won't require students to wear masks on campus

Over 750 faculty at Georgia Tech signed a letter to the University System of Georgia's Board of Regents saying that the school's plan to reopen campus without face mask requirements is dangerous and not based on science.

Georgia Tech won't require students to wear masks on campus. Faculty aren't happy.

jbr's picture

Face shields AND face masks now mandatory on Qatar Airways

Qatar Airways has taken this a step further, announcing that its passengers will be required to wear a face shield -- in addition to a face mask or face covering.

The Middle East carrier says it will be issuing fliers with protection kits -- including face shields, hand sanitizer, a surgical face mask and disposable gloves -- before they board its airplanes.

Face shields AND face masks now mandatory on Qatar Airways

jbr's picture

Miami-Dade to shut down restaurants again as Florida's Covid-19

Wear masks and socially distance and this probably doesn't happen

As of Wednesday, restaurants in the county, the state's most populous, will be shut down -- again -- except for takeout and delivery, county Mayor Carlos Gimenez announced in a news release. The mayor's executive order will also close party venues, fitness centers and short-term accommodation rentals.

Miami-Dade to shut down restaurants again as Florida's Covid-19 hospitalizations surge

jbr's picture

United States at risk of outstripping COVID-19 testing capacity

If demand continues to accelerate and shortages are not resolved, then turnaround times for test results will rise, tests will effectively be rationed, and the number of infections that are never counted in official statistics will grow. Any plan to contain the virus will depend on fast and accurate testing, which can identify newly infectious people before they set off new outbreaks. Without it, the U.S. is in the dark.

A Dire Warning From COVID-19 Test Providers

'Why is it taking so long?' | East Tennesseans wait for COVID-19 results as laboratories see influx of testing

jbr's picture

Dozens of Mississippi lawmakers have coronavirus

About one in six state lawmakers have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to Dr. Thomas Dobbs of the Mississippi Health Department.

For weeks, politicians flouted mask recommendations inside the state Capitol. Twenty-six state legislators have now tested positive for Covid-19, including Lt. Gov. Delbert Hosemann and State House Speaker Philip Gunn. Neither man wore a mask at a bill signing at the governor's mansion last week.

Dozens of Mississippi lawmakers have coronavirus after weeks of refusing to wear masks

jbr's picture

Local restaurant closes for week

Emma's on Sutherland Facebook page ...

We are closing for one week. We have had some positive tests come back today in our Knoxville stores and we want to get an idea of what we are dealing with.

The Burgers- Sutherland

jbr's picture

Pathologist found blood clots in 'almost every organ'

Some Covid-19 patients are known to develop blood clotting issues, but the degree and the extent to which that occurs was described as "dramatic" by Rapkiewicz.

Pathologist found blood clots in 'almost every organ' during autopsies on Covid-19 patients

jbr's picture

COVID-19 turned college towns into ghost towns

“When a university sneezes, the town gets pneumonia. Now when the university has pneumonia, what does that mean for the town?” Stephen Gavazzi, professor of human sciences at Ohio State University, said. “College towns have shops, bars, restaurants, hotels and apartments entirely dependent on students.”

Now, as campuses are unveiling their reopening plans to only hold a fraction of their usual capacity this fall, college towns face an existential threat.

COVID-19 turned college towns into ghost towns and businesses are struggling to survive

R. Neal's picture

Immunity to covid-19 could

Immunity to covid-19 could disappear in months, a new study suggests

The study: Researchers at King’s College London repeatedly tested 96 patients and health-care workers at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust for antibodies between March and June. All the participants were confirmed to have had covid-19, either via a PCR test or a positive antibody test. The researchers found that levels of virus-fighting antibodies peaked about three weeks after symptoms started and then rapidly fell away. Although 60% of participants produced a “potent” antibody response while they had covid-19, only 17% had the same level of potency at the end of the three-month testing period. Antibody levels were higher and longer-lasting in people who had had more severe cases of covid-19. For some milder cases, it was impossible to detect any antibodies at all at the end of the three months. The research is published in a preprint paper in medRxiv, which means the findings have yet to be subjected to peer review.

What it means: The study raises the prospect that, like other coronaviruses, covid-19 could reinfect people repeatedly. If that’s the case, “herd immunity” may never arrive, either through a one-shot vaccine or through community spread of the virus, as any protective antibodies would wane with time. However, antibodies are not the only way people can fight off covid-19. T cells, which seek and destroy cells infected with SARS-CoV-2, could also provide some protection. In short, we have not yet generated enough data from patients to be able to draw conclusions on immunity with a high degree of certainty. There have been anecdotal reports of people catching covid-19 for a second time, but none have been confirmed.

jbr's picture

1 in 3 young adults vulnerable to severe Covid-19

The researchers found 32% of the total study population were medically vulnerable for severe Covid-19. However, when the group of participants who smoked cigarettes or e-cigarettes were taken out of the analysis, the medically vulnerable percentage decreased by half, to 16%.

"Recent evidence indicates that smoking is associated with a higher likelihood of COVID-19 progression, including increased illness severity, ICU admission or death," said Sally Adams, lead author of the study and a specialist at University of California, San Francisco's National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, in a press release. "Smoking may have significant effects in young adults, who typically have low rates for most chronic diseases."

1 in 3 young adults vulnerable to severe Covid-19 — and smoking plays a big part, research finds

jbr's picture

Knoxville allowing restaurants to seat customers outdoors

Knoxville Mayor Indya Kincannon announced Monday the city will be allowing restaurants to apply for temporary permits to add and expand outdoor seating to private parking lots, public parking spaces, and nearby underutilized public/private property.

Knoxville allowing restaurants to seat customers outdoors in parking lots with temp permits

jbr's picture

Walmart bans couple seen in video wearing Nazi swastika masks

I assume these two are registered voters. Another reason why everyone voting is important.

The unidentified man wearing the swastika face covering can be heard saying, "We're living under a socialist state."

Walmart bans couple seen in video wearing the Nazi swastika on their face coverings

fischbobber's picture

Voting

I voted today.

If everything works, it's got a good chance of working.

jbr's picture

Southern mayors push back on state coronavirus response

“The idea that every mayor, every governor, every local official, should figure out their own pandemic response and what to do and not to do is crazy,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, the director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, who led research on Ebola and currently advises policymakers on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jha explained the best way to respond to a pandemic is through national and state level guidance that is customized to local needs, which states ultimately did in the Northeast when they faced their spikes early on — though he noted that governors there waited a week or two too long to react.

Southern mayors push back on state coronavirus response

jbr's picture

Three simple acts can stop Covid-19 outbreaks, study finds

If people washed their hands regularly, wore masks, and kept their social distance from each other, these three simple behaviors could stop most all of the Covid-19 pandemic, even without a vaccine or additional treatments, according to a new study

"If we have that degree of compliance with these simple measures, our models say that's really as good as shutting it down," Giroir said. "These simple facts can really shut down the outbreak without completely shutting down your local area."

Three simple acts can stop Covid-19 outbreaks, study finds

jbr's picture

Hotels attempt to adapt

jbr's picture

Motor vehicle fatalities

Motor vehicle fatalities surged by 23.5 percent in May, as drivers took advantage of open roads to push to autobahn speeds, a situation made easier by the fact that authorities in many communities were pulling back on enforcement, in part, to avoid risking the possibility of their officers becoming exposed to the coronavirus.

Highway deaths spike for third-straight month as drivers take advantage of empty roads

jbr's picture

Birx warns of concerning rise in coronavirus cases in 12 cities

White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx privately told a group of state and local health officials Wednesday about a concerning rise in coronavirus cases in 12 cities as President Donald Trump continues to tout progress amid the coronavirus pandemic at scripted, on-message briefings this week.

"There are cities that are lagging behind and we have new increases in Miami, New Orleans, Las Vegas, San Jose, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Minneapolis, Cleveland, Nashville, Pittsburgh, Columbus and Baltimore, so we're tracking this very closely.

Birx warns of concerning rise in coronavirus cases in 12 cities as Trump paints a rosy picture

jbr's picture

I would not get on a plane or eat inside a restaurant

MarketWatch: I presume you are not hanging out in restaurants or bars. Is it really more dangerous to eat indoors at a restaurant than outdoors?

Fauci: Yes, absolutely. Indoors is much worse than outdoors. If you’re going to go to a restaurant, try as best as you can to have outdoor seating that is properly spaced between the tables.

MarketWatch: So you’re not going to restaurants? You wouldn’t risk it?

Fauci: I am not going to restaurants right now.

Fauci tells MarketWatch: I would not get on a plane or eat inside a restaurant

jbr's picture

Technology making sure workers wearing face masks and distance

At an acrylic fiber factory in Callao, Peru, surveillance cameras and artificial intelligence are tackling a pandemic-era challenge: making sure workers are wearing face masks and staying at least six feet apart.

Cameras that were already in place in the factory provide video that is analyzed by Camio's AI software, pointing out behaviors that would normally seem innocuous but could contribute to the spread of coronavirus. This can range from people walking together in a hallway toward a cafeteria for lunch to a supervisor approaching a worker to have a conversation.

An algorithm may warn you to keep your distance from others

jbr's picture

New technology tests common surfaces for presence of coronavirus

The makers of a new test say that you can use a simple swab to find out in 48 hours if any surface is contaminated with the virus that causes COVID-19.

New test allows people to swab for coronavirus on surfaces in public places

Factchecker's picture

Interesting, given there's

Interesting, given there's little reason to expect significant risk of infection from surfaces. While many of us us have been sanitizing our mail, and more public surface cleaning is generally long overdue, I thought we can pretty much stop worrying about that. (I've almost have stopped decontaminating mail, except out of habit.)

Has anyone heard of any infections that were suspected to have occurred via surface contact?

P.S. This might be more of a tracing thing(?). 48 hours seems long to wait too.

jbr's picture

Mask dispute leaves Staples customer with broken leg

Margot Kagan, of Teaneck, told police she was using a fax machine at the store when a woman with a mask pulled down below her mouth approached a machine next to her. Kagan, who, according to police, had a liver transplant four months ago and was walking with a cane, told the woman to put her mask on.

Mask dispute leaves Staples customer with broken leg after woman throws her to ground

bizgrrl's picture

Too many of these attacks

Too many of these attacks happening. If someone comes close to me without a mask, I make a best effort to leave the area. It is too unsafe to ask others to wear a mask, keep their distance, be safe.

jbr's picture

Jordan is playing politics and Fauci isn't

jbr's picture

bands are playing parking lots to give heartsick fans their fix

Welcome to the drive-in concert, a potential cure for heartsick music fans who yearn for live shows amid the coronavirus.

Third Eye Blind and other bands are playing parking lots to give heartsick fans their fix

jbr's picture

20,000 more Americans could die from Covid-19 in next 21 days

The CDC says new deaths are likely to increase in Alabama, Kentucky, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, Tennessee and Washington. Some of these states previously reported progress in their coronavirus numbers but are now raising their alarm again.

20,000 more Americans could die from Covid-19 in the next 21 days, CDC ensemble forecast shows

jbr's picture

Knox County reports 83 new cases, three new deaths Sunday

Of the 38 deaths in the county, 33 have occurred since the beginning of July

Coronavirus in Tennessee: Knox County reports 83 new cases, three new deaths Sunday

jbr's picture

Coronavirus in Tennessee: Knox County reports 12th death in last

Knox County has now reported 12 new deaths in the last five days. Of the 39 deaths in the county, 34 have occurred since the beginning of July.

Coronavirus in Tennessee: Knox County reports 12th death in last five days

fischbobber's picture

Board of Health meeting 8/5

I contacted the Board of Health after the July 30 meeting (the morning of July 31) and got an e-mailed response from Dr. Buchanon that I would be added to the list. Mayor Jacobs had said during the meeting that he and the Board of Health would "work something out." When calling to confirm location and time this morning, I was informed that Mayor Jacobs had taken over this part of the meeting and that he would determine who did and didn't speak. I will call in the morning to sign up, but I suspect the process has been rigged. Mayor Jacobs is clearly organizing a mob and aside from the very real risk of infection, there is also the very real danger of physical threats in this situation. Any advice or feedback from people more experienced in this sort of thing would be appreciated.

R. Neal's picture

According to a press release,

According to a press release, the meeting will be via zoom but Jacobs portion will be at the City County Bldg and requires in-person attendance:

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.— At 5 p.m. Wednesday, the Knox County Board of Health will convene via Zoom for its weekly meeting. As proposed by Knox County Mayor Glenn Jacobs last week, the Board will observe 30 minutes of public forum at the start of the meeting. Each speaker will have up to three minutes to address the Board.

Although the medical professionals serving the Board of Health have declined to attend in person the meeting being held in the City/County Building’s Main Assembly Room—where public forum will take place—Mayor Jacobs will patch into the Zoom meeting from there.

“When this began, the Board of Health acted as an advisory council, but now these doctors are drafting and approving public policy,” said Knox County Mayor Glenn Jacobs. “No public institution I’ve ever seen can make these types of sweeping regulations without public input. Transparency is the greatest tool we have in government, and this situation is no different.”

To register for public forum, Knox County residents must call the Mayor’s Office at 865-215-2005 to speak to Marsha between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. tomorrow, Aug. 4. Due to time constraints, roughly ten people will be able to participate in the public forum, with a few others queued just in case some don’t use all their allotted speaking time.

Those speaking at public forum will come to the City/County Building at 400 Main Street to work with on-site staff to join the meeting.

In addition to those seats reserved for public forum participants, the Main Assembly can accommodate 50 physically distanced people in its upper and lower levels. The line for entry will be form outside the Main Street entrance of the City/County Building. Physical access to the meeting will be restricted when capacity for the Main Assembly is met. PBA will provide masks to those who don’t have them.

fischbobber's picture

Yup

It’s not enough that Jacobs is trying to rig the forum, he’s forcing all those who wish to speak to a super spreader event. I guess I’ll get ready to get my ass whipped, catch a deadly disease, and die. We all gotta go sometime from something I guess.

Treehouse's picture

Thanks for showing up

WTF Casual Pint? It's really so necessary for you to serve beer in person?!?!
(link...)

bizgrrl's picture

N95 mask, gloves, goggles if

N95 mask, gloves, goggles if you have them.

Hmmmm.... will they take you seriously?

I wouldn't put my life in their hands.

fischbobber's picture

Up at 8:36

Played "It's the seventies and I'm calling the radio station to win a prize" for fifteen minutes, finally got through and spent another fifteen minutes , more or less, on hold waiting for Marsha, whoever Marsha is. She took my information, asked me my topic (The importance of integrity in government officials during a pandemic) and said that the ,mayor's office would decide who would speak.

Last week at the meeting, they said first come first serve.

I will wear a face shield and a mask, bring sanitizer and a hand towel should I get a call back. I'm not holding my breath.

I don't think this is being done because the mayor wants input. This is being done as a power play to try to intimidate the Board of Health. So no, I don't think the mayor will take anyone seriously. This is Kabuki Theatre.

R. Neal's picture

I don't think this is being

I don't think this is being done because the mayor wants input. This is being done as a power play to try to intimidate the Board of Health. So no, I don't think the mayor will take anyone seriously. This is Kabuki Theatre.

Ya think? Should have told her you wanted to tell them how they were trampling your rights and you were thinking about suing them.

fischbobber's picture

Looks like

Looks like I’m going to have to come up with something. I got the call from Marsha that I made the cut. Looks like I’ve got a little speech to write.

bizgrrl's picture

Wonderful.

Wonderful.

Mike Knapp's picture

Get it

Holler if you need some PPE.

R. Neal's picture

May the odds be ever in your

May the odds be ever in your favor.

Factchecker's picture

Good times...

Remember when one of the popular political slogans used by many now in the anti-mask constituency was "Freedom isn't Free"? It's almost as if they never believed in real shared sacrifice.

R. Neal's picture

Way to go

Way to go fischbobber!

(link...)

Knox Co. video, first speaker...

(link...)

fischbobber's picture

Thanks.

I hope I persuaded some measure of good for Knox County.

I've never really done anything like that before.

jbr's picture

100 people in Ohio were infected after man attended church

A man with Covid-19 went to church in mid-June, then 91 other people got sick, including 53 who were at the service, according to Ohio's governor.

"It spread like wildfire, wildfire. Very, very scary," Gov. MIke De Wine said Tuesday

Almost 100 people in Ohio were infected with coronavirus after man attended church service

jbr's picture

One death every 80 seconds

Over the last seven days, a grim new COVID-19 calculus has emerged: one person died every 80 seconds from the coronavirus in America.

One death every 80 seconds: The grim new toll of COVID-19 in America

jbr's picture

Leading Causes of Death in US

Covid-19 is heading to #3 on this list

Leading Causes of Death

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