Sun
Nov 14 2021
06:28 am

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced a 14.5% hike in Medicare Part B premiums Friday night, blaming the pandemic but also what it called uncertainty over how much it may have to be forced to pay for a pricey and controversial new Alzheimer's drug, CNN reported.

The 14.5% increase in Part B premiums will take monthly payments for those in the lowest income bracket from $148.50 a month this year to $170.10 in 2022. Medicare Part B covers physician services, outpatient hospital services, certain home health services, medical equipment, and certain other medical and health services not covered by Medicare Part A, including medications given in doctors' offices.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services played down the spike, pointing out that most beneficiaries also collect Social Security benefits and will see a cost-of-living adjustment of 5.9% in their 2022 monthly payments, the agency said in a statement. That's the largest bump in 30 years.
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However....
It "will consume the entire annual cost of living adjustment (COLA) of Social Security recipients with the very lowest benefits, of about $365 per month,"...
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Along with the premium spike, the annual deductible for Medicare Part B beneficiaries is rising to $233 in 2022, up from $203 in 2021.

It's time to rethink this price increase. Way to high much for many Medicare recipients. Write the President, your congress people, AARP, whoever you think might have some influence and might care.

JaHu's picture

When is the government going

When is the government going to start penalizing the drug companies for the high medical costs instead of the millions of people who depend on it?

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