Thu
Mar 2 2006
11:03 am
By: redmondkr  shortURL

BBC news is reporting a fascinating development in the history of the Battle of the Atlantic.  Three messages encoded in 1942 using a new version of the infamous Enigma machine have resisted all efforts to decipher them . . . . until now.

By running code-breaking software on a “grid” of internet-linked home computers, one of them has been solved.

Read more here.

113
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R. Neal's picture

That's pretty cool. Makes

That's pretty cool. Makes you appreciate what the guys back were able to do with what little primitive computing technology they had at hand.

Mykhailo's picture

Makes you appreciate

 Makes you appreciate what the guys back were able to do with what little primitive computing technology they had at hand.

Or no technology at hand, for that matter -- supposedly, Dijkstra didn't even have a computer until the 90s, and even then used it only for email. He worked through everything in his head, then wrote it down on paper when he was complete.

S Carpenter's picture

Mykhailo says" He worked

Mykhailo says" He worked through everything in his head, then wrote it down on paper when he was complete."

 

I suppose that's genius. But then, I can't imagine...

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