Sun
Jan 20 2019
07:36 am

Ring security cameras, now owned by Amazon, are just one of a growing line of home security systems that store private individual customer data in "the cloud".

From the Intercept.com, Beginning in 2016, according to one source, Ring provided its Ukraine-based research and development team virtually unfettered access to a folder on Amazon’s S3 cloud storage service that contained every video created by every Ring camera around the world. This would amount to an enormous list of highly sensitive files that could be easily browsed and viewed. Downloading and sharing these customer video files would have required little more than a click.

At the same time, the source said, Ring unnecessarily provided executives and engineers in the U.S. with highly privileged access to the company’s technical support video portal, allowing unfiltered, round-the-clock live feeds from some customer cameras.

Then there is this from Consumer Reports.

Under some circumstances, a wireless home security camera made by D-Link can transmit unencrypted video across the web, a Consumer Reports investigation has found. That could allow the video to be accessed by strangers. In response to a Consumer Reports query, D-Link said that security would be tightened through updates this fall.

As explained by a a software engineer in Southern California who purchased a Nest camera system several years ago, "for important discussions about money or family matters, Zavislak and his wife unplug the camera or go into another room. “I’m very aware that the video is being uploaded to a server somewhere,” Zavislak, who is , says. “If it can be coded, it can be hacked.”

Be careful out there.

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