Sun
Jul 4 2010
05:47 am

Libertarians and tea partiers are so enamored by their new ideological BFF that they've taken to dressing up like him on YouTube and spouting off about the evils of taxation, weak foreign policy and too many brown people. But Beck and his minions could probably benefit from actually reading some Thomas Paine. The guy whose 17th century ghost waxes emotional about 9/11 and congressional pay raises on the Internet is also responsible for these ideas:



continued...

Source: 8 Historic Symbols That Mean The Opposite of What You Think


"Pay as a remission of taxes to every poor family, out of the surplus taxes, and in room of poor-rates, four pounds a year for every child under fourteen years of age." Thomas Paine, The Rights of Man.

Huh, that sounds like the child tax credit created under the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, signed by. . . Bill Clinton

"It is painful to see old age working itself to death, in what are called civilised countries, for daily bread... pay to every such person of the age of fifty years ... the sum of six pounds per annum out of the surplus taxes, and ten pounds per annum during life after the age of sixty... This support, as already remarked, is not of the nature of a charity but of a right." Thomas Paine, The Rights of Man.

An entitlement paying old people to support them for not working? That sounds like Social Security, passed by... Franklin Delano Roosevelt

"There could be no such thing as landed property originally. Man did not make the earth, and, though he had a natural right to occupy it, he had no right to locate as his property in perpetuity any part of it." Thomas Paine, Agrarian Justice.

It almost sounds like he's about to say we should all share in the wealth or somethi-

"Create a national fund, out of which there shall be paid to every person, when arrived at the age of twenty-one years, the sum of fifteen pounds sterling, as a compensation in part, for the loss of his or her natural inheritance, by the introduction of the system of landed property." Thomas Paine, Agrarian Justice.

Holy shit! That sounds a lot like...

Related: What kind of libertarian are you?

Rachel's picture

Somewhere in Farragut, a head

Somewhere in Farragut, a head just exploded.

EricLykins's picture

:~)

~~*:~O

We could cut a BUNCH of city services (see Colorado Springs, skip to minute 6 of video) from the budget and let private industry provide them to neighborhoods that can afford bus service and street lights.

giallopudding's picture

Way off base on this comic

Contrary to the misguided view expressed in this cartoon, Libertarians are not the extremists portrayed. We believe in:
- Taxes for roads
- Taxes for police and military
- No taxing a dead person's money, which has already been taxed
- Equality of opportunity, not outcome, for all races
- A government that isn't a runaway socialistic train, heading for a fiscal brick wall

EricLykins's picture

Thanks for visiting all the

Thanks for visiting all the way from Green Bay to remind us of what we learned about Thomas Paine last Independence Day, William. If we counted tax breaks as spending in the federal budget, we might get a clearer picture of where our socialism has been misguided. It's certainly not going to the middle class where it would most foster growth, and it is in danger of being taken away from where it is needed most.

"It is painful to see old age working itself to death, in what are called civilised countries, for daily bread... pay to every such person of the age of fifty years ... the sum of six pounds per annum out of the surplus taxes, and ten pounds per annum during life after the age of sixty... This support, as already remarked, is not of the nature of a charity but of a right." Thomas Paine, The Rights of Man.

Tamara Shepherd's picture

More on Paine:

He proposed to fund his social spending (in England) from disarment, progressive taxes on land, and slashing the payrolls of the government and the royal family.

Said Paine:

Is it then better that the lives of one hunderd and forty thousand aged persons be rendered comfortable, or that a million (pounds) a year of public money be expended on one individual, and him often of the most worthless and insignificant character?

(From a book I read--and recommend--over my recent Colonial Williamsburg vacation, What Would the Founders Do? by Richard Brookhiser. It's in a question-and-answer format, as in 21st Century public policy questions answered by our 18th Century founding fathers. Really interesting.)

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