Tue
Jan 16 2007
12:37 pm

6,932 voted in the '06 county democratic primary..if you are going to run in the '08 democratic county primary..1.RIGHT NOW..i would get a list of those that vote in the '06 primary..by district,if you plan to run for commission, or county wide if you plan run county wide...these are the yellow dogs..& 90% of them will vote in '08..start calling them & ask 'em for a vote & a yard sign & a contribution...2.this summer,get the '06 state democratic primary list & subtract the '06 democratic county primary list(14,800-6932=7868),start calling them askin for a vote & a yard sign & a contribution 3.this fall,get the '04 democratic presidential primary list..subtract your '06 primary list(24,000-14,800=9200),see if those folks voted in the '06 november general..then ask 'em for a vote & a yard sign & 10 bucks.I would start puttin up yard signs LABOR DAY.

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18
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Tue
Jan 16 2007
12:36 pm

There was an Intergovernmental Committee meeting this morning at which several proposals were introduced. Watch Channels 6 and 10 at noon for their reports and interviews.

Word has it that Mark Harmon introduced an innovative proposal that would allow residents to vote on the replacements Commissioners, Sheriff, and others.

Perhaps Dr. Harmon will post to Knoxviews and let us see the proposal?

35
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The irony is astounding. Anybody who knows Les Jones or who has looked at his blog knows that he has been active in helping Johnia Berry's family find her killer.

Yesterday, a Knox County Sheriff's investigator showed up at his house based on a "tip" that Les resembled a police sketch of the killer (which is crazy). Read all about it here.

Michael Silence makes the point that law enforcement can't assume anything and that they have to run down every lead. It's hard to imagine, though, that they didn't know who Les Jones was or that he, along with the Berry family, have at times been critical of the Knox Co. Sheriff's handling of the case.

Stuff like this makes me once again wonder why anybody wants to run a website that discusses controversial issues.

97
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This is purely a functional observation of shopping in Knoxville, of the design of Turkey Creek, and of the design of shoppertainment areas and parking lots in general. Please apply at will to the discussion of appropriate asphalt for the South Waterfront.

I live off Broadway in the 4G/ONK area. couple of weeks ago, I saw a sales flyer for a $99 brown leather office chair from Office Max. Went east to "Knoxville Center" and parked in a vast oasis of largely empty asphalt. They were out of stock, but politely looked in inventory and found one remaining at the Turkey Creek store.

Driving distance 21.2 miles to another vast oasis of asphalt full of very short-tempered drivers.

With New Years sales going on, the parking lot at Office Max Turkey Creek was pretty full. I parked in front of Office Max, got my chair, loaded it in the buggy, took it to my truck. No cart returns. Walked back to Office Max returned the cart. Got the "pissed off accelerated drive around" by a large SUV. They wanted a parking space I was walking past. My apologies to that driver for not having longer legs that could walk as fast as their SUV.

I then walked to Super Target to get a side table. No table. Leaving Target, a driver ignored the pedestrian painted stripes and zoomed past me (which means that pedestrians have the right of way, btw) although, not being a militant pedestrian, I try hard to make eye contact with drivers, yield the right of way, be polite, smile, etc.

Anyway, I then walked back to truck in front of Office Max.

I decided to DRIVE to Super Walmart, parking equidistantly between Walmart and the outparcel Chick-Fil-A. (my lunch plan.) Got table at Walmart, no drive by incidents this time, loaded the table in the truck, and walked to Chick Fil A, (through the drive through lane to get to their "sidewalk." Got honked at (maybe they thought I was a homeless person? who would walk?)

my only point: Turkey Creek could have been designed so much better. It could have been designed as a community but it wasn't. The goal was traffic clogged, destination shoppertainment.

Buying a chair and a table should be relatively pain free, and pleasant. It wasn't. From an objective, function point analysis of moving person, vehicle, and purchases from point A to B to C, it was dysfunctional.

There are some nice shops that would be fun to visit, but it's just not worth it, and I shouldn't have to drive to each store located within the same shopping center. If my son were with me, I would, purely for safety from some of the aggressive drivers.

I'm sure I did it all wrong, it's my fault, I just don't understand, but next time, I'm ordering online and paying shipping.

Turkey Creek could have been more like Gerber Village in Asheville, where they tore down the Gerber Baby Food plant and built this:

From SmartGrowth News:
Asheville's ''Gerber Village:'' No Cars Required

''Gerber Village could be called the 'Anti-Atlanta','' says The Asheville Citizen-Times in an editorial about this $150 million project for the 38-acre south Asheville site of the former Gerber baby food factory, where in three to five years about 1,500 residents will find ''almost every amenity without involving an automobile.''

The site's ''urban village'' zoning district, created by the Asheville City Council under its Unified Development Ordinance ''to encourage smart growth,'' the editorial says, is ''a far better fit than the Wal-Mart Supercenter'' that had been discussed as a possibility.

South Miami's Gulfside Development Co. expects to break ground this summer, planning a total of 230,000 square feet of retail and office space, with its first phase construction completed next spring, and 516 to 616 condominiums.

''Once you're here, everything you need is going to be readily available,'' stresses Gulfside Director of Development Jose Suarez-Marill.

Glad to see similar examples of downtown-like urban villages in Buncombe County, the daily mentions Eastwood Village, Cheshire and Biltmore Lake, concluding, ''In-fill development of vacant land, an increase in the city and county tax base and minimal traffic impact is indeed 'smart growth' and a welcome addition to the landscape.'' -- The Asheville Citizen-Times 5/28/2004

(link...)

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31
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Tue
Jan 16 2007
10:53 am

KNS story here.

Done by Herb Moncier and, get this, it targets Hutchison. Shocking, I know.

184
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Tue
Jan 16 2007
09:58 am

Most at this site I'm sure never cared for him, but nevertheless you will find this funny...

(link...)

17
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Tue
Jan 16 2007
09:26 am
Tue
Jan 16 2007
05:40 am

I don't know how many have seen the movie Lord Of War, but if you have not, you should.

(link...)

Two stories recently released really make this movie hit home.

First:
"AP Exclusive: Military gear bound for Iran, China traced to Pentagon surplus sales"

(link...)

Second:
"He told me that one of his main suppliers had been an interpreter working for the US army in Baghdad. "He had a deal with an American officer. We bought brand new AKs and ammunition from them."

(link...)

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16
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Tue
Jan 16 2007
12:37 am
By: Sandra Clark  shortURL

At tonight's Halls Republican Club, Lumpy Lambert made the case for appointing Democrat Sharon Cawood to replace her husband, the term-limited Mark Cawood, on County Commission.

Lumpy said the outcome of the 2008 Presidential election could hang in the balance. He said Republicans should not be power-grabbing and greedy, lest it reflect poorly on the party in the eyes of the less partisan.

East Tennessee looks to Knox County; the state looks to East Tennessee; and federal elections can be decided by Tennessee (a la Al Gore in 2000).

The Republicans didn't seem to be buying what Lumpy was selling.

I'm sure there's a case for appointing Sharon Cawood ... but it's not to make American safe from Hillary Clinton in '08. - s.

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199
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Tue
Jan 16 2007
12:06 am

(link...)

The sermon which I am preaching this morning in a sense is not the usual kind of sermon, but it is a sermon and an important subject, nevertheless, because the issue that I will be discussing today is one of the most controversial issues confronting our nation. I'm using as a subject from which to preach, "Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam."

Now, let me make it clear in the beginning, that I see this war as an unjust, evil, and futile war. I preach to you today on the war in Vietnam because my conscience leaves me with no other choice. The time has come for America to hear the truth about this tragic war. In international conflicts, the truth is hard to come by because most nations are deceived about themselves. Rationalizations and the incessant search for scapegoats are the psychological cataracts that blind us to our sins. But the day has passed for superficial patriotism. He who lives with untruth lives in spiritual slavery. Freedom is still the bonus we receive for knowing the truth. "Ye shall know the truth," says Jesus, "and the truth shall set you free." Now, I've chosen to preach about the war in Vietnam because I agree with Dante, that the hottest places in hell are reserved for those who in a period of moral crisis maintain their neutrality. There comes a time when silence becomes betrayal.

(cont'd)

Continued...

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19
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Mon
Jan 15 2007
11:13 pm

In a ruling sure to make philandering spouses squirm, Michigan's second-highest court says that anyone involved in an extramarital fling can be prosecuted for first-degree criminal sexual conduct, a felony punishable by up to life in prison.

I'm going to pass this one on without a whole lotta comment.

I think it's best to let you folks read this one without me.

Steve

15
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Mon
Jan 15 2007
03:11 pm

Before NBC yanks it...

Jake Gyllenhaal IS Your Dreamgirl!
SmileyCentral.com

117
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No, that's why we have elections
24% (28 votes)
Yes, for executive offices (sheriff, governor, president)
7% (8 votes)
Yes, for legislative offices (commissioners, state legislators, U.S. Congress)
2% (2 votes)
Yes, they are appropriate and useful for all kinds of offices
67% (77 votes)
Total votes: 115
Mon
Jan 15 2007
09:42 am

Dr. Martin Luther King, April 16, 1963:

We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct-action campaign that was "well timed" in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word "Wait!" It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This "Wait" has almost always meant 'Never." We must come to see, with one of our distinguished jurists, that "justice too long delayed is justice denied."

Continued after the break...

Continued...

38
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Mon
Jan 15 2007
09:20 am
By: R. Neal  shortURL

Dick Cheney says on Fox News that the government has every right to look at your financial records without a warrant, just like they can eavesdrop on your phone conversations, read your e-mail, and open your postal mail without a warrant. Hell, they can arrest you and hold you without any charges and send you out of the country to be tortured if they want.

Here's an idea. It's virtually impossible to catch corrupt politicians in the act unless somebody squeals, so let's make all politicians' financial records, including bank statements, deposit slips, canceled checks, credit card statements, wire transfers, credit reports, tax returns, investment portfolios, and everything else public record subject to Freedom of Information requests.

OK, I know that's silly. And an invasion of privacy. But they might be corrupt! We have the right to know! Anyway, here's a great article on a Bush administration gone wild:

The reason Bush violated the law when eavesdropping is the same reason Lithwick cites to explain his other lawless and extremist measures -- because he wanted purposely not to comply with the law in order to establish the general "principle" that he was not bound by the law, to show that he has the power to break the law, that he is more powerful than the law.

21
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Mon
Jan 15 2007
09:04 am
By: R. Neal  shortURL

Betty Bean has the 6th Floor inside baseball on the term limits decision: "Scores of jobs hung in the balance. Wags joked that they’d never seen so many officeholders at work so late on a Friday afternoon."

Sandra Clark also weighs in with her thoughts on the ruling: "...the court grabbed them by the scruff of the neck, held them up to a mirror and said, 'This means you.'"

213
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Mon
Jan 15 2007
08:40 am

Tom Salter, former candidate for Knox County Commission from the 5th district, will be on the The Voice radio talk show with Lloyd Daugherty and Kelvin Moxley at 9:30 AM this morning to discuss the charter/term limits ruling. Tune in to 1180 AM WVLX at 9:30 AM.

236
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Sun
Jan 14 2007
03:21 pm

Gray Sasser, son of former U.S. Senator Jim Sasser, takes over the reins of the Tennessee Democratic Party.

8
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Sun
Jan 14 2007
11:51 am

From time to time, I've read the blog comments about the South Waterfront project. For those who intend to participate in the process, the MPC will consider making a recommendation on the SW Code at their February 8th Regular Meeting. City Council will not consider the SW Code at their Jan 16th meeting, as had been tentatively scheduled. As the SW Senior Director, I intend to continue addressing any issues raised, and to seek resolution if possible. If MPC does not postpone the SW Code and passes it on to the City Council, then City Council will likely begin its formal review of the code on February 13th. We'll post any new public meetings on the city's website (www.cityofknoxville.org\southwaterfront).

Throughout the South Waterfront process, we have endeavored to provide any information available to any interested citizen. We have also listened to public input and made sincere efforts to reflect what we heard, not only during the development of the Vision Plan, but also through many revisions to the five drafts of the SW Code that have been generated thus far.

The point I want to make is that public debate of the SW Code is welcome and will improve the final product. All participants in the process are serving their interests well, including waterfront property owners, neighborhood residents, Oversight Committee members, members of the general public, MPC Commissioners, and Citiy Council. And yes, I would venture to say that city administrative officials and the SW consultants are also performing well. Although there have been some tough choices and a few emotional disagreements, never once have I felt that any participant did not have sincere concerns about the future health of the South Waterfront.

For all the rhetoric and philosophic discussions, I have a few comments. First, the South Waterfront project has a 20-year life and will be continually monitored to avoid placing any additional burdens on city taxpayers. Existing industrial sites may continue to operate for as long as they like, and may rebuild or expand their current operations. This will remain the case until such time as the property owner decides there is a compelling economic agrument to relocate and either sell or redevelop their property. The same is true for neighborhood property owners - it will remain a private decision to stay, sell, improve, expand, or redevelop their own property. We will also work to develop Homeowner Assistance programs for residents who face financial challenges and want to stay. While we have released a Draft Financial Strategy for South Waterfront Public Improvements, we have never said that we have all the money we need, nor have we said that all needed funds would come from city taxpayers. Several different funding sources have to be aggressively pursued, including state & federal grants and private donations. Many cities have enjoyed considerable implementation success using private donations. The financial monitoring referenced above will include a side-by-side comparison of private vs. public investment. There will be some front-ending of public improvements as stand-alones or through development agreements, but certainly not to the extent of "If we build it, they (private investors) will come."

The South Waterfront has never been portrayed as a superior lifestyle choice as compared to suburban or rural locales. It's ability to capture no more than (and typically less than) 2-3% of the regional market share for different land uses shows that it is more of a niche market than it is a dominant shift in urban lifestyle preferences. I believe the creation of another lifestyle choice enriches our entire community.

The final comment I have is that of trying to reach public concensus. I have a different perspective than others. My advocacy position (and job) is to facilitate open debate and public decision-making. I want to be able to say that a realistic plan has been adopted that will not become a shelf document. I'd like to be able to say that we have assembled an array of tools, including a TIF district, the SW Code, and capture of grant funds and private donations that enable high quality, market driven redevelopment of the South Waterfront. The challenge is that I have not said that every person's concerns will be resolved to their own satisfaction. I truly respect everyone's right to express and advance their own interests, and whenever possible, we have made changes to the better. The decision to present the current version of the SW Code to the MPC and City Council is derived from a judgement call, and I never said that either myself or the SW consultants are the sole arbiters in the process. We try to listen to all the comments, debates, and arguments, which in several cases are conflicting - and try to exercise proper professional and ethical judgment. That's why MPC and City Council are properly positioned to receive professional recommendations and public hearing comments before making their final decisions - democracy in action.

I will continue to defend the South Waterfront process as a good one - public input has been consistent throughout. My only ask is that we maintain civility and don't assign questionable or rotten motives to those who disagree with us. I'm amazed at the things people can say to each other when they are not talking face to face.

14
like

Lost Medicaid Funding

To date, the failure to expand Medicaid/TennCare has cost the State of Tennessee ? in lost federal funding.

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