Wed
Apr 4 2007
03:06 pm

Labeling food as irradiated is hurting business. You don't need to know what has been irradiated, it will just confuse you. They might just call it pasteurized, since both processes kill germs.

Survival of the fittest? While they are at it, why don't they just outsource the irradiation process to China?

FDA will accept public comments on the proposal for 90 days. A consumer group immediately urged the FDA to drop the idea.

Here's the FDA's proposed rule to reference when commenting on the FDA's web site.

44
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Wed
Apr 4 2007
02:11 pm
By: Bbeanster  shortURL

So should the Tennessee men's basketball team be called the Gentleman Vols?

(link...)

52
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Wed
Apr 4 2007
01:08 pm

Item. A century of American home prices plotted as a roller coaster ride.

Item. An excellent discussion of the subprime mortgage crisis and what it means for the wider economy (3/27 hour one).

Item. New Century Financial pushes up daisies, faces probe.

Item. John Voight discusses chocolate-covered cotton with a naked Alan Arkin in a tree.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

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48
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Wed
Apr 4 2007
11:55 am

Obama gets twice the number of donors as Hillary has reported. Via TPM.

How will they keep characterizing us all as Hillary supporters now?

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50
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From a UT press release at the KNS:

A National Championship Celebration will be held for the Lady Vol Basketball team Wednesday, April 4th at 5:30 pm at the Knoxville Convention Center in Exhibit Hall B, doors will open at 5 p.m.

Admission is free to all fans.

45
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Wed
Apr 4 2007
10:13 am
By: metulj  shortURL

With all of the usual suspects whining about Nancy Pelosi's visit to Syria as being either counterproductive or treasonous (you pick), it's nice to see that editorial pages in newspapers in the region are actually glad that she came. The Jordan Times is no anti-Bush rag. It is one of several mouthpieces for the ruling Hashemites and therefore rather predisposed toward whichever way the wind is blowing in Washington.

(link...)

Continued...

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55
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Wed
Apr 4 2007
10:06 am
By: R. Neal  shortURL

Speaking of Congress and their responsibility to "support the troops" in his press conference yesterday, President Bush said:

"They're now failing in that responsibility, and if they do not change course in the coming weeks, the price of that failure will be paid by our troops and their loved ones."

And of course, the Bush administration's incompetence and failures and refusal to change course for the past four years has been the best thing to ever happen to America, our foreign policy, our standing in the world, and our troops and their families.

50
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Wed
Apr 4 2007
08:47 am

Ahmadinejad grants them a "pardon".

49
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Wed
Apr 4 2007
08:00 am

When asked if she was staying on at UT after last night's championship win, Candace Parker said "Why wouldn't I?". Most everyone is reading that with relief this morning, taking it to mean she's staying.

But she didn't really say she was staying, did she? She answered with a rhetorical question: Why wouldn't I?

Apparently Parker has until 10 AM this morning, a little over one hour from now as I type this, to decide. Maybe she's waiting for an answer to her rhetorical question.

She could go to the WNBA, which wouldn't pay much but endorsements could be lucrative. Or, according to ESPN sportscasters last night, she could go to Europe and earn more than $1 million in salary and endorsements. Or maybe both.

She also said "This is where I want to be." I recall the Orlando Magic's Shaquille O'Neal saying the same thing days before he engineered a trade to the Lakers.

I'm no expert on all this, but the tall, smart, talented, and attractive lady hasn't sung yet, until as of 10 AM today. Hopefully she will decide to stay on and go for a repeat in 2008.

UPDATE: Phoenix first draft pick: Lindsey Harding. Candace Parker is not in the lineup. No word from the Russian draft...

UPDATE: Sidney Spencer goes to the Los Angeles Sparks late in the 2nd Round at 25.

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I've only seen a little bit of the American Idol (when Friday Night Lights was taking a break or when there was nothing else on but reruns), but this Sanjaya guy creeps me out, and he can't sing either. I can't figure out why he still on the show.

But there's lots of blog buzz this morning about his appearance last night, in which he apparently wore a white John Travolta suit and mumbled his way through a standard for Tony Bennet.

Apparently he's Big News. Google has over 3300 news articles on the guy this morning. Technorati lists nearly 32,000 blog posts about him.

Last week, CNN was interviewing two political analysts about Congressional funding for the war and the pending veto. The conversation got quite heated, and the wobbly talking bobble-head hostess interrupted to say "We'll have to leave it right there" and then told viewers to stay tuned for their upcoming report on Sanjaya and his outrageous hairdo. I kid you not.

So what's up with this guy and the people who keep voting for him? Well, it turns out that it may be a vast internet conspiracy to sabotage American Idol. Here's an example from "votefortheworst.com":

Yes, Sanjaya rocked it in a white suit with slicked back hair. Call 1-866-IDOLS-07 or text VOTE to 5707. Simon couldn't even talk and just called it, "Incredible" to try a new tactic and get rid of Sanjaya. Don't let his new tactic work, Sanjaya's gonna need a LOT of help this week so vote as much as possible for the entire 2 hours. Let's help him get to Latin music week next week for a rousing performance of "Shake Your Bon Bon." You know you want to.

Howard Stern is involved, too. The show's executive producer denies that internet campaigns and such can have any influence on the outcome. Tell that to Dan Rather and Trent Lott.

On the other hand, the whole conspiracy thing might be a manufactured controversy cooked up and coordinated by the producers as a PR stunt. In which case it appears to be working, and I salute them.

At any rate, I hope Sanjaya wins. It would pretty much sum up what the show is really about, and it's not singing.

82
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Wed
Apr 4 2007
05:12 am

A national tax preparation service has been targeted by the IRS and the Justice Department for filing fraudulent returns:

The government said Tuesday it is trying to shut down more than 125 Jackson Hewitt tax preparation stores in four states for systematic "tax-fraud schemes."

The Justice Department accuses the franchises of bilking the government out of more than $70 million through fraudulent practices such as using phony W-2 forms, bogus deductions and fuel tax credits and false claims regarding the earned income tax credit.

Jackson Hewitt Tax Services Inc. is the nation's second largest tax preparer. The franchises were either totally or partially owned by Farrukh Sohail, the Justice Department said, and involved "a pervasive and massive series of tax-fraud schemes," according to court filings.

Based on where the suits were filed, it appears the franchisee operates in Illinois, Michigan, Georgia, and North Carolina.

(The company has offices in Knoxville, Maryville, and Alcoa, but they do not appear to be affected and it is not clear if they are franchises or company owned stores.)

Jackson Hewitt responds in this press release:

The complaints announced today by the Department of Justice are limited to one franchisee, whose entities noted in the complaints operate more than 125 locations out of more than 6,500 Jackson Hewitt locations nationwide. The Company estimates that these entities represent about two percent of its total revenue. We do not believe that this matter is likely to have a material adverse effect on our financial position.

While we cannot comment on franchisee litigation, Jackson Hewitt takes such matters seriously. The Company expects its franchisees, which independently own and operate their businesses, to comply with the terms of their franchise agreements. Accordingly, they are responsible for conducting their operations with integrity, in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.

Jackson Hewitt remains committed to providing accurate, quality tax preparation and the highest levels of customer service. Comprised of a network of thousands of tax preparers, and franchisees nationwide, the Jackson Hewitt system values its relationship with its customers and continues to assist them with their upcoming income tax filing requirements.

What a mess. The company's stock was down over 18% yesterday.

It's interesting (and somewhat disturbing) how the ripple effect of bad PR related to one franchisee can affect the company, their shareholders, other franchisees who could likely be small business people with everything they own tied up in their franchise, not to mention consumer confidence in the company and its services.

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55
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Democratic Sate Senator Ralph Anderson from South Carolina has suggested giving inmates time off for organ donations. 60 days for bone marrow and 180 days for a kidney. Senator Anderson, an African American, is no stranger to the prison system. He has been working with inmates for years. He said he got the idea after hearing a speaker at his church talk about the lack of black organ donors. You're not allowed to sell organs in the U.S., but this would not be selling (or would it?). I guess you could call it bartering which really was the way most goods were exchanged for centuries.

For years now people in China have accused that government of actually killing people (mostly Falon Gong, who are members of a cult outlawed by the government) just to get their organs. Apparently China is the ONLY country in the world where there is a huge availablity of much needed organs. The wait in the US can be months or years. So it's not just trinkets that China is producing. It's also somehow got a whole lot of organs available.

Is Senator Anderson's bill logical and compassionate? He believes it is, but others disagree. 60 days for bone marrow? 140 days for a kidney? Would these organs even be healthy enough to use?

This proposal gives rise to a whole lot of questions.

51
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Tue
Apr 3 2007
09:51 pm

It was great. Really concerned before the game, but I don't think they ever trailed.

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It does seem like there must be a safe place for these kids to get help. Arresting them seems like such a stupid idea because it will just add to their self-loathing and anger. Surely there has to be a better way of handling these incidents. Too many mentally ill people end up looking "dangerous" to the police. Adults they sometimes shoot. Maybe the police ought to have special training on how to subdue an aggitated child without using such extreme measures. Even if the charges are eventually dropped, it can cause an already troubled kid even more problems. 6 years old is so young!

These incidents both happened in Fla...hmmm...

This one can't stop kicking pregnant people.

This one scared her teachers, so they called the cops on her.

52
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Tue
Apr 3 2007
09:49 am
By: R. Neal  shortURL

Lamar Alexander announces that he will announce he is running in 2008 at the appropriate time. Will Kurita and/or Ford make another run at it? It will be a much tougher row to hoe for any Democrat this time around, I imagine.

90
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Tue
Apr 3 2007
09:16 am

An idea that has been kicked around for a while is back in the news. The Maryland State Senate has passed a bill that would commit the state's electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote. It is expected to be passed in the House and the Governor says he will sign it.

The bill would only take effect if enough states to make up a 270 vote Electoral College majority pass similar bills.

According to Wikipedia, similar bills have passed both houses in only two states (Maryland and California). California's bill was vetoed by the Governor. All but 13 states have introduced a bill in one or both houses. If Maryland's bill is passed and signed into law by the Governor, they will be the first state officially on board.

In Tennessee, HB841/SB811 would enact Tennessee's participation in the plan.

It's probably a hard sell to folks who want their vote to count at the state level. On the other hand, it would make their vote count at the national level. As the Washington Post column notes:

Remember, states get one electoral vote for each member of the House of Representatives plus both senators. No matter how small, every state has at least three electoral votes. The three electors from Wyoming, with an estimated 2006 population of 515,004, represent 171,668 people each. California, with a population of 36,457,549, gets 55 electors, each representing 662,865 people. A presidential vote cast in Wyoming thus has nearly four times the value of a vote in California.

So you could argue that not only has the Electoral College outlived its usefulness now that we've moved beyond travel by horse into the jet age, it's also not very democratic, either.

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169
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Tue
Apr 3 2007
08:19 am

Couldn't happen to a nicer guy. Perhaps Reynolds will start distancing himself from the Mighty Wurlitzer that is the right wing noise machine. Nah.

Glenn didn't get "burned to a lesser degree." Seems the law perfesser libeled Michael Ware. Is there such a thing as "lesser libeling?"

49
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Tue
Apr 3 2007
08:05 am
Tue
Apr 3 2007
07:26 am

David Sirota has this must-read, thought-provoking look at "personality politics" that explains a lot about why we have Democratic candidates who are all over the map on issues (and why the GOP would take Fred Thompson seriously as a candidate):

Obviously, the Democratic Party did not engineer the original rise of personality politics. That happened as part of a broader political evolution that took place in the era of infotainment. But a political party's active efforts to prioritize personality politics over any core ideology unifying the party is something very new, and something that changes the definition of political party in fundamental ways. If one of the objectives of a political party is to shun any core agenda, then the political party ceases to become a political party, and becomes something akin to a gang: an entity that is concerned exclusively with power and money and that sees anything like convictions, conscience or ideology that might get in the way of those assets as a mortal threat.

His prescription: Populist campaigns built around issues instead of personalities. I could not agree more wholeheartedly.

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44
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Lost Medicaid Funding

To date, the failure to expand Medicaid/TennCare has cost the State of Tennessee ? in lost federal funding.

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