Sun
Oct 21 2012
03:16 pm

Just read through the KNS voter guide. no favorite movies or books, thank goodness. And a nice job on summarizing the County charter amendments.

But not a single word about the City charter amendment? Srsly? What's up with that?

83
like
fischbobber's picture

F.O.P. had an ad.

The F.O.P. had an ad against changing the officers pension. There was an article about Rogero endorsing the city pension change at some point this week.

I thought the charter amendments had far more straightforward language than I'm used to seeing. Thanks to whoever wrote the amendments for that. I thought the charter committee did a good job, regardless of the outcome.

Perhaps that was the reason for the sparse reaction from the Sentinel?

fischbobber's picture

Found it

I found this on YaHoo.

(link...)

jbr's picture

More significant local and

More significant local and area election coverage is something newspapers could hang their hat on as part of their changing role in the news. To me a sample ballot should be in print numerous times. Maybe even daily. On the front page. With each issue an exhaustive, unbiased, presentation, of maybe a one race or charter like issue on the ballot. Giving people time to read and think about each one. Gradually building a printed "right before the election" booklet people can review a few days before the election.

Unbiased, including no endorsements. No wording slanting toward particular candidates. But exhaustive factual coverage, of every candidate and item on the ballot.

This would over time spur more voting, more informed voters, use the information gathering resources of the newspaper for the community greater good, and boost the relevance of local newspapers.

The papers could partner with school systems to take this information into the schools and make it part of the curriculum during each election cycle. I would not have any trouble with the school systems paying the papers for teaching and providing educational resource to schools. Then you have a generation that turns 18, as informed, thoughtful, motivated voters.

Tamara Shepherd's picture

*

The papers could partner with school systems to take this information into the schools and make it part of the curriculum during each election cycle. I would not have any trouble with the school systems paying the papers for teaching and providing educational resource to schools. Then you have a generation that turns 18, as informed, thoughtful, motivated voters.

The News-Sentinel's Newspapers in Education program, paid for in part by donations from subscribers, continues to dump huge piles of newspapers on the doorsteps of my community's schools, every morning, I think.

When my own kids were in elementary school, we school-level PTA volunteers delivered a voter education progarm every year and also hosted a Kids Vote stand on election day at our community's polling place, namely the high school. Kids came to the polls with their parents, voted on our computer terminals, and heard their own vote count announced over the PA system at their elementary school during the next school day's morning announcements. I worked the event for years.

I asked poll workers just this past Friday, when I went to early vote, whether area elementary school PTAs continue to host such events or whether the increase in the number of people now early voting had killed such programs.

Among the four poll workers seated at this table at my early voting location (on Schaad Road), none had ever heard of the Kids Vote program.

jbr's picture

Looks like a good program.

Looks like a good program.

However, I think this needs to be a part of the curriculum, k thru 12, in evRey school in the system. Every year, when an election cycle comes up.

Yours looks like some passionate volunteers that did it when their kids were in school. A good proof of concept.

metulj's picture

PR professionals kiss their

PR professionals kiss their pinkie rings and sleep well.

Mike Cohen's picture

Metulj response

In this particular case, you couldn't be more wrong.

I think most PR professionals in this market want more people to vote, want more people informed and believe more voter interest and response is good for our community for government.

If you don't think that's true, consider naming some names or examples.

Personally I'm helping, in a small way, the city get out word on the pension plan...and doing so pro bono because I think it's important to our fiscal future.

You don't hear me accusing lots of college professors of making a lot of money, not teaching many classes and basically having things pretty easy. That's a widely help belief, but I don't think its true.

If you're going to trash my profession, be accurate and specific.

metulj's picture

No. My assertion is that your

No. My assertion is that your hard work is done. C'mon, you are in the business of making the bad look good and keeping the good from looking bad. If there is a powder puff voter's guide like that, you count that as a success.

Hypothetical: You take on Desjarlais' issues. A completely uncritical voter's guide that does not mention any of his negatives is a good thing. Right?

As for college professors, we can't afford PR professionals and most, like myself, don't care what the public thinks about us. If all industries had the employment reviews that we have in academia, people would change their tunes. When they tell you that if you don't do these 500 things within the next 6 years, you are fired*, things become very clear. And then, all you get is a $2000 pay raise and a contract that merely spells out how you can be fired in the future. Still, I love what I do.

*and if you don't make tenure, you are done. That's it.

Rachel's picture

Question for Mike

Do you have any idea why the KNS Voter Guide failed to mention the City charter amendment?

Was this a deliberate decision or an oversight?

Mike Cohen's picture

PR

You don't understand the business.

You apparently think that C'mon, you are in the business of making the bad look good and keeping the good from looking bad. is the core of what we do. It is not.

Most of us don't take on causes or clients that we don't believe in. And far more of our time is trying to get out legitimate information so people are informed. Making the bad look good is not our prime function. We might have to do is sometimes (I certainly have) but it is not what we do most of the time.

metulj's picture

Sure, but the big money is in

Sure, but the big money is in dust busting.

OK. So, you would not turn away an universally reviled client (let's say: Big Tobacco) if the money was right?

Mike Cohen's picture

Clients

I wouldn't stay away from a client because they were reviled...if I thought they were in the right.

Big tobacco. It would depend on what they wanted. If they wanted to me help with an anti smoking campaign, even with the provisos they inserted ((link...)) then, yes...I would work on that. I wouldn't represent them on something selling tobacco or encouraging its use.

Tamara Shepherd's picture

*

Yours looks like some passionate volunteers that did (the aforementioned Kids Vote program) when their kids were in school. A good proof of concept.

Yes, I'm sure I helped to ensure many thousands of next generation Republican voters in the suburban/rural community of Powell. Laugh or cry...

Say, maybe we should focus on delivering this sort of program only in urban areas?! Now, there's a "concept!"

Mike Cohen's picture

Voter Guide

Rachel...

I don't know. I suspect it was an oversight because I can't imagine it being intentional.

I will let you know if and when I know more.

Tamara Shepherd's picture

*

Sorry I was among the culprits to have usurped your thread, Rachel.

I'll mosey along, now...

jbr's picture

Apologies -- A Culprit

Apologies

-- A Culprit

Mike Cohen's picture

Kids Vote

It was a good program. I believe I was on the board for a while. (And yet it was still a good program)

I think they ran into funding problems.

The person who could tell you more is Laura Nichols, who was the Executive Director. She is the wife of Attorney General Randy Nichols.

We had kids voting and got good media coverage of the results.

Tamara Shepherd's picture

*

I believe I was on the board for a while. (And yet it was still a good program).

Gee, Mike--sounds like you might have missed some meetings?!

Seriously, it was a great program and we should do what we can to bring it back. Thanks for your service.

Rachel, really moseying now...

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