Sat
Sep 19 2015
05:31 am

The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Pellissippi Parkway Extension is complete and available from TDOT. The FEIS was approved by the Federal Highway Administration on September 10, 2015.

You can access a PDF of the FEIS document and related appendices at TDOT's web site. From the link destination, select the Library tab then the "Approved FEIS 2015" link, or one of the six links for the various appendices.

The FEIS is also available at the local TDOT office in Knoxville, the Blount County Public Library, and the Blount County Chamber of Commerce. (Heh.)

Comments can be submitted to TDOT at the following address.
Comments should be submitted by November 18, 2015 (was October 18, 2015).
Tennessee Department of Transportation
FEIS Comments
Attn: Pellissippi Parkway Extension (SR-162)
Suite 700, James K. Polk Building
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1402

I can't stand to read the document. It makes me sad.

UPDATE: TDOT has extended the public review period for comments on the Pellissippi Parkway Extension FEIS. Comments will now be accepted through November 18, 2015.

Jackie's picture

Finally

It's about time!!! Thank goodness.

yellowdog's picture

Read it yet?

I have yet to meet anyone who favors this boondoggle who has even read the Draft EIS and suspect no such person will bother to read the Final either.

The minor detail of the road not helping with traffic is too much to absorb, apparently.

And at $160 million? That is why "we" "need" a gas tax?

michael kaplan's picture

as a reminder

Pellissippi.jpg

jbr's picture

Purpose and Need?

I see the phrase "Purpose and Need" mentioned in a few places in what I have read. But I cannot find what is the "Purpose and Need" definition for this project. Is that in one of the documents?

R. Neal's picture

Here's a good analysis. It's

Here's a good analysis. It's from the draft EIS, but still mostly applies. Scroll down to "purpose and need" section.

(link...)

R. Neal's picture

Also, from the final EIS (pg.

Also, from the final EIS (pg. 5-2):

Purpose of the Proposed Action and Transportation Needs

The proposed action is intended to address identified transportation needs in the study area. These needs have been identified during the public and agency coordination activities conducted for the project between April 2006 and February 2008, as well as through prior planning efforts and review of current transportation and community plans. The transportation needs are:

• Limited mobility options in Blount County and Maryville because of the county’s primarily radial roadway network.
• Poor local road network with substandard cross sections (with narrow lanes, sharp curves, and insufficient shoulders) in the eastern portion of the county.
• Lack of a northwest/east connection east of Alcoa and Maryville to help serve:
− Expanding residential development occurring in eastern Alcoa and Maryville and northeastern Blount County
− Demand for trips between Maryville and Alcoa and the Knoxville area to the north as shown by current high traffic volumes between the areas on US 129 (approximately 40,090 vehicles per day) and SR 33 (approximately 6,230 vehicles per day)
• Safety issues on roadways in the area, including roads in the Maryville core. People traveling between the north and western portions of the county and the eastern portions of the county
must pass through the Maryville core. Numerous rear-end crashes and angle crashes reported due to high volumes of traffic and lack of access management along the roadways.
• Traffic congestion and poor levels of traffic operation on major arterial roads (in particular US 129, SR 33, and US 411) and intersections in the study area

As you can see from the previously mentioned analysis, a lot of this is bunk.

jbr's picture

TPO’S LONG RANGE REGIONAL MOBILITY PLAN 2040

I thought this list was interesting. Several 8-lane highways listed in the Alcoa/Maryville area.

TPO’S LONG RANGE REGIONAL MOBILITY PLAN 2040

bizgrrl's picture

TDOT's originsl plan was to

TDOT's originsl plan was to put in bridges/underpasses, but the local businesses didn't like the idea at the urging of City of Alcoa management. TDOT then came up with the plan for the 3.5 mile bypass. Ridiculous.

I still don't understand why all of Alcoa Hwy can be widened except for this short section. There will be traffic deadlocks at both ends

yellowdog's picture

Demand way down, cost way up

See p. 87 of the FEIS for acknowledgement that initial "demand" figures were way too high. Many fewer cars, much higher costs, no clear benefits except maybe 10 minutes "saved" from Townsend to Oak Ridge. About $16 million per minute. Gas tax, anyone?

Somebody's picture

Curious. Where did the

Curious. Where did the $160,000,000 price figure come from?

If that's the estimated price tag being suggested, then the build-out cost is something between $28 million to $36 million per mile. On another thread, an estimated $20 million per mile was suggested as a reason to not even consider construction of light rail, anywhere. Am I missing something here?

bizgrrl's picture

UPDATE: TDOT has extended the

UPDATE: TDOT has extended the public review period for comments on the Pellissippi Parkway Extension FEIS. Comments will now be accepted through November 18, 2015.

Comments can be submitted to TDOT at the following address.
Comments should be submitted by November 18, 2015 (was October 18, 2015).

Tennessee Department of Transportation
FEIS Comments
Attn: Pellissippi Parkway Extension (SR-162)
Suite 700, James K. Polk Building
505 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37243-1402

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